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ajnealey

If you wanted to double your car count, what would you do?

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Hey Folks,

 

My wife and I currently run a 1 bay operation. We are looking to expand into a larger facility. We are currently hitting 60-70 cars per month. Running the numbers to operate a 5 bay facility that we're looking to purchase. We should be doubling our car count to stay profitable.

 

Here is my marketing strategy to accomplish this, I would love your feed back as well:

 

-Ribbon cutting event, grand opening party, live music, food, beverages, give aways, have other vendors come out to support event, etc

 

-Direct mail campaign - MudLick mail? ValPak? (Thoughts)

 

-Google pay per click advertising

 

-Signage - it would be on a major road in community

 

Looking for the best bang for the buck opportunities to get up and running and then explore other marketing ideas for the future.

 

Thanks for your input!

AJ

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