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If you get this type of feeling, its time you find a service advisor!


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So I have my Service Advisor off to training for a few days in San Diego and that means I am manning the front end. I am pretty dang good at talking to people I would like to think but had to present some pricing to a customer and all he kept saying when a price for a job was given was, "Wowwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww." I just realized how much I dislike talking to people in a Service Advisor capacity. Like I really can't stand it LOL. That is not to say I don't like speaking to my customers because I do. I just hate the daily grind of dealing with the one off customer that has unrealistic expectations that no one can meet. God bless all your service advisors out there. I am about ready to hire my second one just so I never have to do this again haha.

 

 

Moral of the story is if you ever have that type of feeling then its high time to get a service advisor! Make sure they are a people person too, that helps!!!

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I am right there with you bro, I can talk to my customers all day about what needs to be done to their vehicle, what to do while your in alaska, and everything else under the sun. But as soon as its time to take someones money, or tell them how much their repairs are going to be I hate it.

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I don't necessarily mind asking for the sale however there are just certain people that cannot be pleased when it comes to dollars. They can be the nicest sweetest people but they cannot be parted with their money and its the most frustrating thing to deal with at times. I literally have no problem taking home a bit less if it means that I don't have to deal with that annoyance.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I don't have a lot of patience for that either. We can talk politics, we can talk about eastern Europe, we can talk about their car all day but the minute they suggest my techs time is worthless the conversation is over Its really quite simple - this is broke, it costs this much to fix it. If they "weeelll the guy down the road said..." I lean into the shop and say "put it outside and bring in Mrs smiths car" thanks have a good day. I'm busy, I don't have time to play lets make a deal. "How much cash no tax?" Yea right call Albany and apply for a tax # and ask for a refund at the end of the quarter.

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  • 3 months later...

Got to love 'em all! We see about 300 cars per month at my shop and naturally we're going to have a few of them that don't like the prices. Like you've all said, it isn't worth discounting and fighting over. I have a bigger issue with folks who lean up against my glass walls watching their car like a hawk asking questions about what we're doing and why in a demanding and rude manner. Had a customer freak out about how we took off a spin on oil filter because whomever did it last time over-torqued it and it collapsed with the filter tool. We had to take him out there and show him all while he's cussing and yelling. After about five minutes of being patient and explaining I finally told him I can't have him freaking out in my shop upsetting my other customers and staff. 'I know what I saw and if I have problems YOU'RE going to fix them!", he yells. I walk up to him, look him in the eye and said "I know you think you know what you saw but your truck is going to be just great or I will fix it at my cost." He just stares back at me and I at him. When we finished I have the Tech put the car up in the air to show him nothing is wrong with his truck, nothing is damaged, everything is fine. He again persists with his line of doubtful questioning and I say, "I've already told you this but I will go through it again..." He calms down and apologizes about five times, comes back the next day for tie rod ends and couldn't be nicer. Says to me, "I'm from Brooklyn, this is how we are. Where are you from?" I'm from here in Iowa and tell him. "I'm not so sure you're not from Brooklyn, too." We laughed and we have a new customer.

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Got to love 'em all! We see about 300 cars per month at my shop and naturally we're going to have a few of them that don't like the prices. Like you've all said, it isn't worth discounting and fighting over. I have a bigger issue with folks who lean up against my glass walls watching their car like a hawk asking questions about what we're doing and why in a demanding and rude manner. Had a customer freak out about how we took off a spin on oil filter because whomever did it last time over-torqued it and it collapsed with the filter tool. We had to take him out there and show him all while he's cussing and yelling. After about five minutes of being patient and explaining I finally told him I can't have him freaking out in my shop upsetting my other customers and staff. 'I know what I saw and if I have problems YOU'RE going to fix them!", he yells. I walk up to him, look him in the eye and said "I know you think you know what you saw but your truck is going to be just great or I will fix it at my cost." He just stares back at me and I at him. When we finished I have the Tech put the car up in the air to show him nothing is wrong with his truck, nothing is damaged, everything is fine. He again persists with his line of doubtful questioning and I say, "I've already told you this but I will go through it again..." He calms down and apologizes about five times, comes back the next day for tie rod ends and couldn't be nicer. Says to me, "I'm from Brooklyn, this is how we are. Where are you from?" I'm from here in Iowa and tell him. "I'm not so sure you're not from Brooklyn, too." We laughed and we have a new customer.

 

 

Nice story! I think I would have fired him immediately... and my shop is a mile away from Brooklyn! LOL

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  • 1 month later...

I actually like talking to people, and selling stuff. My issue is I love fixing stuff more. I find myself routinely getting too technical with customers and usually by the end of the convo they are out there floating by the moon, That is where my buddy comes in. He has a very direct, passive aggressive approach. I laugh at how stupid he sounds sometimes, and ppl are like oh ok! Yeah lets do it.

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

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      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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