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John Pearson

Soda or walnut blasting intake valves.

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Direct injection is starting to make its way in the the independent shops. What are you all doing to remove the carbon build up in the intake chamber? This is something that I do not have much knowledge about but for see it becoming a large service at 50-100k.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PS8riAae_bM Here is a good video that explains why and the fixes that are being attempted.

 

 

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