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John Pearson

Dealerships Being sneaky.

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Three weeks ago I got a letter in the mail for my 2005 Cadillac CTS-V for the ignition switch recall and a fuel pump module recall, so I call my local dealer and make an appointment. One and a half hours later they give me a call and tell me that I need two keys to perform the recall. Being that I only had one I tell them to just cut a second key and bill me for it. Their service advisor provides to tell me that it's going to be 54 for the cadillac key or 9 dollars for a regular key and 150 for programing.

 

150 for programing I ask, yes sir your vehicle has a system called passlock and the key needs to be programed after being cut. She knew who I was and what I do and she still tried to charge me to program a key that doesn't need programed.

 

Just today, I bought a C6 Z06 Corvette in kansas and had it taken to the local dealer for a check up, oil change and what ever else it needed including a few recalls. About 3 hours later I get a call from the advisor telling me that the TPMS needs to be reprogrammed at a cost of 49.95 even though the car didn't have any TPS lights on when it was dropped off. (these cars do reduce performance when you have a bad TPS sensor)

 

So I just told him that was fine Ill take care of it when I get back to Alaska, well he insisted that he will just take care of it for me at no charge so I say thanks and hang up. About 7 min later he calls me back and says that because it requires the use of the Tech2 that he will only charge me 39.95 (this car doesn't require a scan tool). So I decline and tell him Ill just bring the equipment with me to take care of it when I pick up the car at the end of the week. Thats when all hell broke loose and he told me that I didn't know what I was doing.

 

Why is anyone going to the dealers if this is how they are being treated?

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