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Letter to the Editor

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The following is a story that I sent to the local paper as a letter to the editor. It was ran this past Tuesday. Think you may enjoy reading it and be inspired.

 

http://www.courierpress.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/commentary-spotlight-on-caring-epd-officers_65881643

 

Editor, The Evansville Courier & Press
300 E. Walnut St.
P.O. Box 268
Evansville IN 47702-0268

 

Dear Editor:

 

Val is a lady in her 50's that I have known for several years and I consider her to be my friend. She is not very tall and probably doesn't weigh more than a 100 pounds soaking wet but is intelligent and as gritty and spunky as a pit bull. Unfortunately, Val is unable to work due to chronic back problems that multiple surgeries have not cured. While living in constant pain she bravely survives on a meager disability income which leaves her constantly scrambling to make ends meet.

 

Val has been coming to our shop for several years to have her car worked on and we have helped her at times by doing work at reduced prices and allowing her to pay as she was able. However, lack of money to do needed repairs and the age of the car all came to a head recently. When she came into the shop there was no way around it. Her car needed a $1000 worth of repairs to keep it on the road, probably as much as the car is worth. While I could do a bit to reduce the cost there was no way to eat all of the work or let her charge an amount that large. It was a nut simply too big to crack. I gave Val the bad news and she went outside presumably to call family or friends. This is when the wonderful story that I am going to relate begins to unfold.

 

It just so happened a first time customer, a retired policeman who now teaches criminal justice at an area university, had paid for his car, picked up the keys, and walked out the door but a few minutes later he came back into the shop. He told me that there was a woman (Val) out on the front sidewalk crying and he wanted to know the cirumstance. I explained the situation and he told me to let him see what he could do. He would talk to his friends including several police buddies. A few minutes later he came back in asking me to do what I could to keep the cost down and telling me that he would raise the money to fix the car. Subsequently, he brought me $200 in cash and an hour later a uniformed Evansville police officer I have never met brought me a check for $100. The next day all of the parts needed for the repair bought and paid for by he and his friends were brought in. When it was all said and done Val's car was fixed and she was able to pay her part of the repair in full. Now she has a dependable means of transportaion again due to the fine gentleman and his friends.

 

What a wonderful reflection this is on our community, on our police and our law enforcement officers. Police are receiving a lot of bad press but I would like to declare that there are many officers who are kind, compassionate, considerate human beings that put their lives on the line for us everyday. We also hear a lot of bad press about race relationships especially abuse of the African American community by the police. Did I mention that Val is African American and that all of those who helped her fix her car are white? No one ever saw black or white they just saw a woman in need and reached out to help. I say hurray for the fine citizens and police of this community who let me participate in and witness this wonderful act of kindness and compassion. “God bless us everyone”!

 

 

G. Frank May, Manager

Car-x Auto Service

 

 

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