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Using aftermarket converters

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Any input on aftermarket vs oem converters. Just got bit for the first time. Wondering if anyone has any experiences. What's bad in this case is - although it was disclaimed that using aftermarket a code could reappear, I feel responsible. She asked what I would use - I said aftermarket. I've never had issues.

Secondly the converter we sold her was in the $590 range OEM is over $1,000. Only lasted about 1,000 miles.

 

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