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TOYOTA AVALON 2008 Check Engine Light does not display when you turn the ignition

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Please I need your suggestion. Am currently working on a Toyota Avalon 2008. It was not starting so I did a diagnosis and got the error code P0335- Crankshaft Position Sensor 'A' Circuit Malfunction and P0102 - Mass or Volume Air Flow Circuit Low Input. I cleaned up the CKP sensor, same issue and I went ahead to replace it,replaced the air filter, I discovered the engine oil was very dirty and due for a change, I had to do that, the fuel filter was cleaned up. After all that the car came up, was fine for some time and went off again. I did another diagnosis and got P0393 - Camshaft Position Sensor 'B' Circuit High Bank 2. All this while the check engine light was still on. We noticed a cut on the cam shaft sensor and tried amending it. The car came up, was on for 15 minutes and went off again. Right now when you turn on the ignition all the dashboard lights comes up exclusive of the check engine light. What could be the likely cause?

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    • By Gonzo
      Picture This ---- I learned a little something when I was teaching a little something Picture This
       
      (A lesson learned while teaching)
       
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    • By Gonzo
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    • By rpllib
      The following are posts I made on the AOCA website outlining an issue(potential nightmare) we had on 2017 Chevrolet Colorado:
       
      Randy_Lucyk
      Joined: Dec 21, 2011
      Total Posts: 83  Feb 8, 2018 3:03 PM Unfortunately, I believe this is exactly what this may turn into for shops and consumers. We recently had a report of an oil filter failure on a 2017 Chevrolet Colorado with 13304 miles on the truck and the issue occurred 400 miles after our oil change. Customer had a check engine light come on so he headed right off to the dealer to have it checked under warranty. It had a VVT code stored and the dealer started looking into the issue. They found the filter failure and sent a picture of the image off to the customer. We used a Performax P0171 filter. The customer sent me the attached image of the obviously failed filter. I am immediately highly concerned, but the dealer is being unusually understanding of the failure. We spend some time with the service manager and find out that their appears to be an issue starting to show up on these vehicles, where the stand pipe in the filter housing is coming off with the old filter and being disposed of without the techs knowledge. We had great video of the oil change and their was nothing visible with the old filter as it was removed. The premises is that without the standpipes restricting/diverting functionality in place, full oil flow is blowing out the filter and the everything flows right down the filter housing port into the cylinder heads and remainder of the motor and plugs up components and passages. We asked for a picture of the filter housing and received image 2 attached. This appears that it may be a problem starting in 17 model year, but i can't be sure of that yet. I am digging for additional info now and will update as more information becomes available.  Randy_Lucyk
      Joined: Dec 21, 2011
      Total Posts: 83  Feb 9, 2018 7:59 AM This appears to be both a GM issue and a in-shop issue. 

      Now that I see the notification GM released last week, i believe this issue occurred at the original oil change prior to the one we did. As I said, we had great video of the open end of the old filter as we removed it from the vehicle and I don't believe this stand pipe could have possibly been inside. Their is also no evidence of the tech struggling with anything "down in there" other then the normal A/C line interference issue. . 

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      Looking at the attached illustrations and notice, it would not be easy to completely miss the fact that a problem was evident. The stand pipe looks too big to me to be easily missed. I suspect it is plastic and the words "housing cracked" was mentioned in the conversation with the service manager. I wonder if the stand pipe is actually cracking during removal of the filter, making it difficult/impossible to reinstall. If we did not do it, then why the old filter had not failed yet ours did, comes into question. Cold weather "full oil flow" was also mentioned in the conversation with the service manager, and those were the conditions at the time of the failure. 

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      Based on the notice from Gm, this does indeed look like it could get ugly. Although, this dealer covered all the extensive engine repairs under warranty(heads pulled, all new timing components, cleaning passages), i am not convinced all dealers will take that approach. In my case, it was nice(incredible?) to see GM step up and take responsibility. It helped that my customer (owner of the Colorado) retired from a GM primary supplier dealing with issues exactly like this for the later half of his career. He knew the right people to call to get the info needed to drill down to the root cause. 


      Randy Lucyk 
      Midas Kalkaska



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      Here is a link to a question on Quora that I supplied an answer to and so far it has gotten over 3,700 views and 75 upvotes.  Thought that you might be interested in reading it.
       
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