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It seems every day you read about new technology or advancements in technology and electronics with regard to the modern and future automobile. With driver-less cars, hybrids, electric cars, hydrogen cars and other technological advances, will the repair shop business as we know it today be able to survive?

 

I am saying that there will not be a need for repair shops. There always will be. And there will be a bright future for those you keep pace with technology. What I am saying is this; Will shops be able to tool up and hire techs that are able to handle all the different technical areas of the future automobile?

 

Here's an example:, back in 50's, Transmission shops emerged and were a separate business from the traditional repair shop. Transmission rebuilding was a highly specialized business.

 

Could we see more specification in the future? We are already seeing this on some level with The Hybrid Shop.

 

Younger shop owners need to consider this and watch the trends and technology very closely.

 

Your thoughts?

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