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Jeff

Extended hours

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I am considering offering late night hours, maybe till 8 or 9 pm. I am in a primarily working class town with a fair population of retirees. I don't see a lot of options for folks who don't get home from work till 6-7 pm. Having had some of the worst months I have ever had in business I am trying to find ways to boost revenues. I really hate having to use the DIY stores for parts but if I can add cash flow then ??

I am already flexible for my regulars but I don't promote it.

What are you thoughts? Thanks for the input.

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Edited by Jeff

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