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alfredauto

anyone else frustrated with the new mitchell pro demand?

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Like the title says, anyone happy with the new Mitchell? For us it has become the most useless time wasting service manual we've ever used. On demand 5 was good, then they upgraded it and it was ten steps back, then they made it better again and there's absolutely no information. The manager program is still good.

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