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We've got an opportunity to expand, in a big way. The expansion would require a somewhat significant investment in equipment, and monthly rent. That being said we're maxed out at our current location, with 2 week wait in some cases. This would allow us to have 10+ vehicles inside at any given time.

Any advice? The opportunity was dropped in my lap out of no where. The building owner is a family friend, which scares me a bit.

The building is on a major highway, lots of traffic, and no other shop for 5 miles in any direction. Another plus is the location is very close to our current location. I'd be concerned he'd market it to another shop which could possibly impact our walk in sales. Our profit numbers are the best they've ever been, and we're finding production (revenue) to be limited by shop size. When big jobs come in it literally can bring our shop to a halt.

I'd rather not make a rash decision or a decision I won't be able to pay for, so I'll be taking a hard look at the numbers prior to making a decision as well.

Just curious if you guys had a guideline for expansion.

 

Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk

 

 

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