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ncautoshop

Opinion on today's situation

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Today we saw a 2000 jeep grand Cherokee in for a overheat. Back story is the customer came in last year (end of last or beginning of this) for a low oil pressure concern. After looking at the vehicle it was found the cooling system was completely chocked full of rust/contamination. Customer states vehicle was low on oil causing low oil pressure, we drained approximately 18 qts of engine oil from the vehicle, the engine oil was actually over the cam. (No oil/water contamination. The vehicle also fails a block test so the head is removed and a blown head gasket is found (visibly blown). we flush the cooling system with vc9 a Ford flush solvent and then follow up with subsequent flushes using bg products. The system had been neglected for a long time and even after the head had been hot dipped and radiator replaced we still had contaminates present but it was much less severe than initially seen. The customer was under time constraints and demanded to complete the flush himself.

Skip forward to last month and the vehicle comes in for a boil overflow. Over flow hose chopped over the fan (looking back I probably wouldn't have accepted a decline on the fan shroud), cooling system and system contaminated again. My first though is blown head gasket or cracked head. Test for combustion gas in cooling system with none present, run vehicle to operating Temps and test drive, return to the shop and no combustion gas in coolant. Cooling system slightly pressurized after test drive but not extreme. However when engine was shut off coolant rushed out into the overflow. Cooling system pressure was watched and operated within range. flushed again and replaced the cap. Fixed all the other small issues and gave it back. Comes back today with combustion gas in coolant and violent expulsion of coolant. Thinking now we've got a cracked head which isn't all that uncommon.

As I mentioned above the head was checked by a machine shop and they were aware of all symptoms present. I was billed for pressure testing, magnaflux and surfacing.

Now I'm prepared to accept partial liability to save face, and looking back I likely would have handled the first job differently. I'm thinking of covering labor (parts store is covering the gasket set) and letting the customer find and pay for the head, or we'll sell a reman with markup. This won't be painful as the job is fairly easy and straight forward and we do quite a few. Honestly the customer (and family) are a little sketchy and the can become verbally agressive and even when given a typical quote are know to go off. They'll accuse you of damaging their vehicle and driving all the gas out, go shop to shop cussing about the last.

 

My questions are A: how do I word this to the customer to save face and avoid. I'm currently thinking about pointing out the huge discount directly after mentioning the head purchase.

B: should the customer cover coolant and fluid expenses?

C: is it truly a fair deal for the customer that we're paying labor and parts with the exception of the head?

D: cylinder 6 was scored last head removal, should I push for a whole engine job to cover my but and avoid being married to this thing forever?

 

I've considered the fact that we're not truly to blame here, and that the machine shop missed a crack, or it just occurred, and the warranty is nearly expired. But no more of an issue is it will be for us to handle it I don't see why not help a customer out.

Any advice is greatly appreciated. I've never had any professional service writer training so this forum is extremely valuable!

 

Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk

 

 

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