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mmotley

handling oil change prices

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Just curious, how are others handling the pricing of oil changes? More specifically, how are your service writers giving prices for oil changes if someone calls in? I know, I know, I know, many of you don't like price shoppers, but they still call and I would like to give them the quickest and best answer possible.

 

Example: Customer calls in and wants to know how much for an oil change on their 2002 Toyota Camry. Where does your service writer get the price? Does he/she just say 'our oil changes start at $40 for a 5 qt oil change and each additional qt costs $5?'... What if the customer wants to know how much oil their car is going to take? Do some of you guys out there have a 'cheat sheet' with a table on it showing the year/make/model/fluid capacity/price, or is everyone going through mitchell/alldata and asking the customer to hold while you get this info?

 

The reason I ask, I called a quick lube place this week, and the kid who answered the phone seemed to have the prices and info pretty quickly... Either he is really on the ball and knows his cars/fluid capicities/prices or he had a cheat sheet or computer program that had him the info quick.

 

I know at my previous employer, they had a 'cheat sheet' with all the basic prices listed for oil change/air filter/cabin filter/rotation/etc. but they were a high end dealer and could make flat rate prices for all the cars. Every oil change cost the same there, 4,6, or 8 cylinder (with the exception of one car). I don't think that's feasible in an aftermarket shop.

 

Any thoughts or input is greatly appreciated!

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