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I first-time customer arrived to us the other day, a referral from one of our regular customers. She had a drivability problem which her repair shop could not diagnose, so they sent her to the Honda Dealer.

 

The car was supposedly diagnosed at the Honda Dealer, but she declined any work being done there. After my service advisor wrote her up, I asked her, “What made you leave the dealer without letting them repair the problem?” She replied, “I got a real bad feeling with the way both the women at the counter and the service guy spoke to me. I just did not trust them.”

 

They told her she got a load of bad gas and wanted to remove the tank, flush it out, flush the injectors and do a de-carb. They were wrong. The problem was a valve adjustment, which we did, and the car runs like new.

 

We did manage to save her money and correctly diagnose the problem. But, what was more interesting, were her instincts about the dealer’s credibility. Also interesting, she had only good words to say about her regular repair shop, even though they could not diagnose the problem. Why? I guess because they were honest.

 

Even in today’s crazy world, honesty and integrity still wins out in the end!

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