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How many of you have a pit? ... and how many of you wish you didn't?

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How many of you folks actually find a pit useful nowadays? Do you wish you just had another lift or two in it's place?

 

We have a pit that can comfortably fit 2 cars with room to spare in between. The issue is that it was built/spec'd out in the 40's by a family member who was 5'2" (on a good day), so it was decided to not make the pit very deep.

It's sort of handy/nice for exhaust work and oil changes, but even I (5'8") need to tilt my head and really watch what I'm doing to not catch myself. We had a guy years ago that was 6'3" who absolutely hated it.

 

In the course of making some repairs to the pit .. it looks like the concrete is deteriorating in one section to the point that I may need to weld up a frame and plate to support the concrete or build a concrete block wall.

 

I'm contemplating filling the pit in if it turns out to be a safety issue... but if I ever get a quick lube going in the future I don't want to kick myself for filling it in.

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