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What type of productivity is seen in indy shops? I know we're small and with one person doing the book work, writing and repairing the cars I shouldn't expect much but I'm seeing claims from other folks to have 19 techs, each turning 10-15 hours each day. That's a little disheartening when some days we do 8-10 others 4 and some 2. What's should I look for as a goal?

 

Thanks for you're suggestions in advance.

 

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