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What brand welding machine would you recommend?

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Hi, our automotive repair facility is looking to purchase a new welding machine to start repairing catalytic converters, exhaust systems, and mufflers. Any suggestions for a particular brand to recommend? Also, any insights for any distributors or where to purchase catalytics from?

 

Thanks in advance for your help and opinion.

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