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Last night I took my wife to our favorite local Italian restaurant; a kind of, pre Mother’s Day celebration. When we pulled into the parking lot it appeared that the entire town had the same idea. I did make reservations so I had no fear we would be seated ok. The host told us our table would be ready within 10 minutes.

 

I wasn't finished pushing my chair in when someone walked over and put the bread on the table. Shortly after that the waiter came over and in a really quick voice told us the specials. It almost sounded like those guys at an auction. We needed more time, but he was persistent and game back shortly. We gave the waiter our order and he marched off.

 

It had to be no sooner than a few minutes when the appetizers arrived and it was much long after that the dinners arrived. My reaction was, “Wow, that was fast, were these meals pre-made?”

 

The entire experience felt rushed. We have been to this place many times before and part of the reason we go back is for the experience. The food is always good and we never minded the wait.

I guess what I am saying is that the fast service was more in line with a diner, not a fancy Italian restaurant.

 

This got me thinking about what we do, especially customers that wait for a repair of service. What are their perceptions of time? Does time have a factor with our customers with respect to the cost of a job? I know we look at productivity and track time, but how does this equate to the value and perception of the consumer? Can service be too fast?

 

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