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I have never believed in engine flushes especially for engines with high mileage. Lately we have several VW with sludged engines. Some of them are under a class action to be replaced by VW. The others we have sent to the dealer. This gripes me. So, I am looking into the situation. Our dealer here charges $500 for this service. The Jiffy Lube charges $89.99. There must be a difference in solution, filters etc. According to our Honda Tech and European tech where they worked before, they would pull the valve cover off 1st if possible to check condition before flushing on a car with less than 90K miles. On the case of De-Sludging that the car already has a problem, they would do it with no guarantee, that maybe it would take care of the customer's problem. I want the groups opinion.

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