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Joe Marconi

Anyone Tried Groupon?

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Has anyone tried Groupon? I have talked to a few businesses and there a lot of mixed reviews. Through Groupon, you offer a discount which is purchased by the conusmer and Groupon takes a portion of the profit upfront. Groupon sends the offer through a email blast of thier member base. From what I gather, you may get many people into your shop, but they are coming for that cheap discount. The other side is, you get a chance to maybe find new customers.

 

I would like to hear from other shops owners who have done Groupon or have opinions on this.

 

Groupon link:

 

http://www.groupon.com

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