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Flash Sale + Social Proof

Staffing Models


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I'm new to the forum and would like you thoughts on the proper staffing level for a 4-6 bay shop. I realize there are several variables that must be considered (Hours of operation, experience, estimated work load, product mix, etc.) but, based on your experience, are there some general rules to staffing a facility? I recently read an article that suggested a minimum of three Service Managers, four Sales Associates, and at least four Technicians. Would this model work in your shop? Would you recommend a tweak or two? Thank you for your input.

 

Shop Article

http://www.shopownermag.com/Item/88203/recipes_for_shop_success.aspx

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I think that is overstaffed. I operate a 7 bay shop with gross sales of $900,000+. We currently have our largest staff ever: two service writers and 6 technicians.

 

 

Thank you for your feedback. Do you operate 7 bays without a service manager? Does one of your Technicians fill that role for you? Additionally, do your Technicians order parts or do the Service Writers handle that? Thanks again.

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I'm new to the forum and would like you thoughts on the proper staffing level for a 4-6 bay shop. I realize there are several variables that must be considered (Hours of operation, experience, estimated work load, product mix, etc.) but, based on your experience, are there some general rules to staffing a facility? I recently read an article that suggested a minimum of three Service Managers, four Sales Associates, and at least four Technicians. Would this model work in your shop? Would you recommend a tweak or two? Thank you for your input.

 

Shop Article

http://www.shopownermag.com/Item/88203/recipes_for_shop_success.aspx

 

Great question. Car counts must be taken into account as another factor in determing staffing for any shop. Before I expanded, my facility was a 6 bay shop. I can tell you what my business model was, which worked quite well and maybe you can draw some conclusions.

 

For our 6-bay shop we had 4 techs, one service advisor and a shop foreman. I helped out on the counter when needed and helped with diag work, when needed. Our car counts back then were 100-135 cars per week. We were open Mon thru Fri and half day on Saturdays. Our avergae repair order was approx $375.00. We also have a clean up person who worked every day from noon to closing to keep the shop clean.

 

This model for us worked. Every shop is different. Don't overload your shop with service personell. The right service advisor can handle one to three techs easliy. I recommend to create a lead-tech position or foreman to help with work flow. This will help with productivity. Most important; create systems and polices that MUST be followed by your techs and service advisors. This is key to your sucess.

 

Hope this helps.

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Great question. Car counts must be taken into account as another factor in determing staffing for any shop. Before I expanded, my facility was a 6 bay shop. I can tell you what my business model was, which worked quite well and maybe you can draw some conclusions.

 

For our 6-bay shop we had 4 techs, one service advisor and a shop foreman. I helped out on the counter when needed and helped with diag work, when needed. Our car counts back then were 100-135 cars per week. We were open Mon thru Fri and half day on Saturdays. Our avergae repair order was approx $375.00. We also have a clean up person who worked every day from noon to closing to keep the shop clean.

 

This model for us worked. Every shop is different. Don't overload your shop with service personell. The right service advisor can handle one to three techs easliy. I recommend to create a lead-tech position or foreman to help with work flow. This will help with productivity. Most important; create systems and polices that MUST be followed by your techs and service advisors. This is key to your sucess.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

Thank you Joe for the details- this looks very close to what we believe would be the right mix. I have a background in Lean/ Six sigma so I'm a BIG believer in systems and policies. Thank you again for your wonderful explanation.

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My service writer/manager and I do all pricing, selling and parts ordering. When we are both working it is the service writer/managers job mostly. I help when he is too overloaded plus I always handle the pricing and sale of all tires. On our days off we each do the others job with the help of one of the techs that we have trained to help run the front.

 

 

Okay I get it now--two up front (you and a Service Manager/Writer) and six good Technicians in the back. There must be days when you are slammed up front--do you ever feel like its too much? Also, I see you are selling tires--do you have General Service Technicians that just handle the tire and lube work?? Thanks again for your experience and candor.

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Thank you Joe for the details- this looks very close to what we believe would be the right mix. I have a background in Lean/ Six sigma so I'm a BIG believer in systems and policies. Thank you again for your wonderful explanation.

 

Six Sigma! I am impressed. I have not met anyone yet in the auto business who has knowledge of six sigma. I have studied six sigma principles and use a lot when creating my work flow processes,especially in the area of reducing comebacks.

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Six Sigma! I am impressed. I have not met anyone yet in the auto business who has knowledge of six sigma. I have studied six sigma principles and use a lot when creating my work flow processes,especially in the area of reducing comebacks.

 

 

I'm sure there are plenty of folks that pracitce Lean principles in teh auto business--they just may not know it. I agree that reducing comebacks is very important and Six Sigma can help if you properly document each comback and work hard to fully understand the root cause of the failure. Thanks for all your help.

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