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Jiffy Lube Announces Extended Oil Change Service?


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Jiffy Lube Announces Extended Oil Change Service?

Maybe Not!

 

When I read the headline that Jiffy Lube is doing away with their 3,000 mile oil change service interval, I was somewhat confused. All indications state that the Quick Lube industry has experienced a decline in car count for the past 10 years. So why would Jiffy Lube make this announcement? Well, it’s call marketing.

 

Jiffy Lube service advisors will now work with customers to figure out what is the right oil change interval for their Particular driving habits. The customer is in involved with setting their own oil change schedule. Jiffy Lube, instead of surrendering to the factory extended service schedule, has found a way to win back its business.

 

Initial results: 47 percent of customers have decided that they drive under severe conditions and have chosen an average oil change service interval of 3500 miles. An additional 43 percent have chosen an average interval of 4,100 miles. This means that 90% of Jiffy Lube customers have opted for an oil change interval of 4100 miles or less! They found a way to beat the OE recommendation.

 

Boy, I wish I had thought of this…

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Those numbers are when most people change their oil anyway so you are right its just a marketing ploy. All they did was let the customer do what the customer was already doing anyway and make the customer think that they were in control. LOL

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  • 10 months later...

May be this was the reason for the Jiffy Lube change: Lawsuit Hits at Jiffy Lube Intervals.

 

http://www.imakenews.com/lng/e_article002438181.cfm?x=bl7MPc7,b186n0qP,w

 

I am not one to stick up for Juffy Lube or any other quick lube, but I do not like the tone of the class action suit. While the 3,000 mile interval may be a little out-dated, a business as the right to make recomended oil change intervals and not be held hostage to what the factory states. The car makers want to sell cars, if they could they would put a pad lock on the hood. Car makers know that preventive maintenance and more frequent oil changes will extend the life of any car to hundreds of thousands of miles. We know that, that's why we promote preventive maintenance.

 

I recommend 4,000 for conventional oil and 7,500 for syn. I educate my customers who care about their cars to adere to this policy. I would hate someone else dictating policy for me. Imagine your doctor not being able to make recomendations?

 

Please, I would like to hear from other ASO members on this one...

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  • 3 weeks later...

What's next? We make a recomendation that a vehicle needs a transmission service at 65,000 miles based on the condition of the fluid and we get sued because the owner's manual states 100,000 miles. This is crazy. We make recomnedations based on condition. It does not state in the owner's manual when to change wipers and brakes, but if a car needs them, you replace them. Right?

 

We are the pro's. The car maker wants t sell cars and create the illusion that their cars don't need a lot of maintenance. If customers followed our recommendations, cars would last a long time, break down less, pollute less, have a higher resale value, perform better and would be more fuel effecient.

 

That's exaclty what the car maker does not want.

 

Agree or not?

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What's next? We make a recomendation that a vehicle needs a transmission service at 65,000 miles based on the condition of the fluid and we get sued because the owner's manual states 100,000 miles. This is crazy. We make recomnedations based on condition. It does not state in the owner's manual when to change wipers and brakes, but if a car needs them, you replace them. Right?

 

We are the pro's. The car maker wants t sell cars and create the illusion that their cars don't need a lot of maintenance. If customers followed our recommendations, cars would last a long time, break down less, pollute less, have a higher resale value, perform better and would be more fuel effecient.

 

That's exaclty what the car maker does not want.

 

Agree or not?

 

Agree.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Agree. I find that more people believe only what someone else tells them and hardly what the mechanic tells them. Unless, like you've stated you have those types of customers that take pride in their car and are more than interested in what the professional mechanic is telling them.

 

It's the myths and rumors of how to maintian a car that get thrown into everyday conversation as if its facts.

 

Like I've said before, print "Avoids Trees" on a golf ball and some dummy will buy it thinking he'll never hit a tree ... ever again.

 

 

What's next? We make a recomendation that a vehicle needs a transmission service at 65,000 miles based on the condition of the fluid and we get sued because the owner's manual states 100,000 miles. This is crazy. We make recomnedations based on condition. It does not state in the owner's manual when to change wipers and brakes, but if a car needs them, you replace them. Right?

 

We are the pro's. The car maker wants t sell cars and create the illusion that their cars don't need a lot of maintenance. If customers followed our recommendations, cars would last a long time, break down less, pollute less, have a higher resale value, perform better and would be more fuel effecient.

 

That's exaclty what the car maker does not want.

 

Agree or not?

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