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Joe Marconi

Become an Effective Leader

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Become an Effective Leader!

 

Every company needs an effective leader. Not someone that demands people to do things, that’s not a leader. A true leader gets the people in the company to do what is right for the company because they want to, not because they are told to.

 

Leaders listen, they coach, and they become truly interested in the welfare of the people around them. It’s a daunting task at times, but it’s the job of every shop owner.

 

What type of leader are you?

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