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Ron Ipach

Marketing Online with Video

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In case you didn't know it already, posting a video about your shop on youtube (or any of the dozens of video sharing sites) will help you get found online. Google owns Youtube, so they rank video real high.

 

Most people think you need to get in front of the camera (which is terrifying to most) and be able to speak like a pro. WRONG!

 

You can create a great video right on your computer using only Powerpoint slides, add some music, and screen capture software - all of which you can download free trial versions right from that new-fangled thingy called the internet! :D

 

Here's an example of one that I created this morning in only about 15 minutes.

 

In case you want the details - I used a Mac computer, created and recorded the slideshow in Keynote, and mixed my own music using Sonicfire Pro 5.

 

Enjoy...

 

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