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2005 Subaru Axles causing vibration


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Here’s a problem everyone should be aware of. We replaced both axles on a 2005 Subaru Outback, 2.5. We replaced the axle because both outer axle joints boots were broken. After we put the axles in, the car had a bad vibration at idle and felt like bad engine mounts.

 

We found an Identifix bulletin about aftermarket axles causing this problem. A few phone calls to the part supplier later, we found out that these axles are new from China and they are machined wrong and somehow transmitting the engine vibrations thru the vehicle.

 

Many part companies carry these axles under different names, so be carefull!

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Here's a problem everyone should be aware of. We replaced both axles on a 2005 Subaru Outback, 2.5. We replaced the axle because both outer axle joints boots were broken. After we put the axles in, the car had a bad vibration at idle and felt like bad engine mounts.

 

We found an Identifix bulletin about aftermarket axles causing this problem. A few phone calls to the part supplier later, we found out that these axles are new from China and they are machined wrong and somehow transmitting the engine vibrations thru the vehicle.

 

Many part companies carry these axles under different names, so be carefull!

 

That's almost funny Joe, a year ago or so I had the same situation... It was because the joints were to stiff... they wouldn't turn smoothly... made the car vibrate like crazy. Had to switch manufacturers...

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I have had this problem in the past (several times with Hondas). They would vibrate bad under load. I have come to the conclusion not to ever used remaned axles unless I absolutely have to. I have had much better luck with new axles and I don't have to mess with the cores.

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According to my supplier the problem is with the Chinese parts. I think American auto parts companies have shot themselves in the foot in attempt to be too completive on price. Maybe it’s because the market demanded it?

 

If you think about it many parts like calipers, rotors, started, alternators, axles, etc have come down in price drastically the past 5 years so. And I think the quality has gone down too.

 

And when you think about, if shops are working on a fixed margin (like 50% markup), we were better off when a brake rotor cost $30.00 as opposed to $15.00.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Let me give everyone an update on the vibration problem after we installed 2 new Chinese axles in a 2005 Subaru Outback. After trying 3 different sets of new axles with no luck, we got 2 used alxes from the junk yard, installed them and the vibration is gone. I am not sure why or how, but these new Chinese axles were the prolblem. In my area, no other parts house stocked another brand and the dealer was off the chart with thier price.

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Joe, I noticed you replaced these because the boots were torn. Have you ever just replaced the boots? I do that at my shop and I think it has potentially saved me these headaches. I've heard for a long time that the best parts for a car are the ones they are born with, I think in this case that rings true? Of course, just changing the boots does require more labor and you have to make sure they are installed and greased properly, so maybe it's not the best idea? Just searching for ideas...

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Joe, I noticed you replaced these because the boots were torn. Have you ever just replaced the boots? I do that at my shop and I think it has potentially saved me these headaches. I've heard for a long time that the best parts for a car are the ones they are born with, I think in this case that rings true? Of course, just changing the boots does require more labor and you have to make sure they are installed and greased properly, so maybe it's not the best idea? Just searching for ideas...

 

Years back all we did was replace boots, as long as the joints were ok. But as the price on axles came down it became more profitable to install a reman.

 

More and more suppliers are selling new alxes at prices starting at $49.95. But, we have seen an ever increaseing problem with "new axles" lately and are considering going back to replacing boots. It is more labor, but at least the job will be done right.

 

We really never had an issue with remans, just lately with this Chinese junk.

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  • 4 years later...

old topic but we just had the same problem. Another shop removed the original torn axles and put in "new" ones on a Subaru. Gravy job turned bad, it picked up a bad vibration on acceleration. They balanced the tires and replaced the axles under warranty. Same problem. Sent it to us frustrated. We identifixed it and sent back the new "new" axles and traded them for new "reman" axles, problem solved. Customer normally would have been screwed $115 per side on the cores as the originals were gone but lucky for them we had some laying around in the junk pile.

 

We don't rebuild axles or replace boots anymore either, the reman axle with lifetime warranty is faster to install and cheaper in most cases.

Edited by alfredauto
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