Quantcast
Jump to content


Joe Marconi

2005 Subaru Axles causing vibration

Recommended Posts

Here’s a problem everyone should be aware of. We replaced both axles on a 2005 Subaru Outback, 2.5. We replaced the axle because both outer axle joints boots were broken. After we put the axles in, the car had a bad vibration at idle and felt like bad engine mounts.

 

We found an Identifix bulletin about aftermarket axles causing this problem. A few phone calls to the part supplier later, we found out that these axles are new from China and they are machined wrong and somehow transmitting the engine vibrations thru the vehicle.

 

Many part companies carry these axles under different names, so be carefull!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Forum Topics

    • By rpllib
      The following are posts I made on the AOCA website outlining an issue(potential nightmare) we had on 2017 Chevrolet Colorado:
       
      Randy_Lucyk
      Joined: Dec 21, 2011
      Total Posts: 83  Feb 8, 2018 3:03 PM Unfortunately, I believe this is exactly what this may turn into for shops and consumers. We recently had a report of an oil filter failure on a 2017 Chevrolet Colorado with 13304 miles on the truck and the issue occurred 400 miles after our oil change. Customer had a check engine light come on so he headed right off to the dealer to have it checked under warranty. It had a VVT code stored and the dealer started looking into the issue. They found the filter failure and sent a picture of the image off to the customer. We used a Performax P0171 filter. The customer sent me the attached image of the obviously failed filter. I am immediately highly concerned, but the dealer is being unusually understanding of the failure. We spend some time with the service manager and find out that their appears to be an issue starting to show up on these vehicles, where the stand pipe in the filter housing is coming off with the old filter and being disposed of without the techs knowledge. We had great video of the oil change and their was nothing visible with the old filter as it was removed. The premises is that without the standpipes restricting/diverting functionality in place, full oil flow is blowing out the filter and the everything flows right down the filter housing port into the cylinder heads and remainder of the motor and plugs up components and passages. We asked for a picture of the filter housing and received image 2 attached. This appears that it may be a problem starting in 17 model year, but i can't be sure of that yet. I am digging for additional info now and will update as more information becomes available.  Randy_Lucyk
      Joined: Dec 21, 2011
      Total Posts: 83  Feb 9, 2018 7:59 AM This appears to be both a GM issue and a in-shop issue. 

      Now that I see the notification GM released last week, i believe this issue occurred at the original oil change prior to the one we did. As I said, we had great video of the open end of the old filter as we removed it from the vehicle and I don't believe this stand pipe could have possibly been inside. Their is also no evidence of the tech struggling with anything "down in there" other then the normal A/C line interference issue. . 

      Looking at the design and the A/C line interference, I suspect that the stand pipe is being knocked loose as the filter is being "angled" around the A/C lines to get the old one out. I suspect the oring on the stand pipe is the only thing holding it in the oil filter housing. Once the standpipe is disposed of, the housing has to be replaced, as the stand pipe is not available separately. The housings are in short supply with only three left in the country on dealers shelves and none in Gm distribution centers. Their is a new part number for the housing and those are not available yet. Original pt# 12675707 and new pt# 12682014. 

      Looking at the attached illustrations and notice, it would not be easy to completely miss the fact that a problem was evident. The stand pipe looks too big to me to be easily missed. I suspect it is plastic and the words "housing cracked" was mentioned in the conversation with the service manager. I wonder if the stand pipe is actually cracking during removal of the filter, making it difficult/impossible to reinstall. If we did not do it, then why the old filter had not failed yet ours did, comes into question. Cold weather "full oil flow" was also mentioned in the conversation with the service manager, and those were the conditions at the time of the failure. 

      The images also create some questions for me. The new housing does not appear to be identical to the OE installed housing, so is it an already redesigned housing? The filter bulletin in the Napa/Wix box talks about an update to the filter to include a check valve in the top of the filter. Our old filter does not appear to have this check valve, the Napa/Wix does and our new stock P0171 filters also have it. Looking at the design of the stand pipe in the new housing, it would almost appear that the small nipple on the end of the stand pipe might make more sense if it fit into the open hole of the old filter. The stand pipe design almost seems wrong for the filter with the check valve, unless it is shorter than it looks and never reaches the upper end of the filter. Would be great if the next shop to have one of these off would post some additional pics to try and help reduce confusion. 

      Based on the notice from Gm, this does indeed look like it could get ugly. Although, this dealer covered all the extensive engine repairs under warranty(heads pulled, all new timing components, cleaning passages), i am not convinced all dealers will take that approach. In my case, it was nice(incredible?) to see GM step up and take responsibility. It helped that my customer (owner of the Colorado) retired from a GM primary supplier dealing with issues exactly like this for the later half of his career. He knew the right people to call to get the info needed to drill down to the root cause. 


      Randy Lucyk 
      Midas Kalkaska



    • By ALANBOYER
      We are a general repair shop operating in a large mountain West city. The shop has been in business since 1964. Four bay shop soon to be six. We have a second small two-bay shop. Both locations have a high demographic of Subaru owners. We are in the process of moving towards becoming a 100% Subaru service and repair. I welcome all thoughts and ideas on the following questions and them some.
       
      1. Has anyone attempted and or succeeded at converting from general repair to specialty?
       
       
      2. Best practices in specialty marketing. I must launch this fast?
       
       
      3. How to handle telling folks we will no longer be servicing their vehicle?
       
       
      4. Specialty technician recruiting ideas. How do I get guys out of the dealer?
       
       
      5. Any Subaru specialty shop owners out there willing to get together? I will come to you.
       
       
      Thanks in advance.
    • By UsedTireShop
      We are stumped on this one. This van was limped to us by the customer who tried to fix it himself. Truck was skipping and barely running.
      We shimmed the new crank sensor. Reset the distributor (it was off 2 teeth). We repaired the common ground issue this vehicle has. Changed the dist. cap and rotor with Eclin parts.
      Truck ran great for one day. Day 2 it was limped back to our shop. We found that we had to cycle the key to get the fuel pressure up. We replaced the clogged fuel filter. Truck still wouldn't start because of no spark.
      We changed the ignition module and the truck started and ran fine for a little bit. The tech noticed that the voltage gauge was pinned in the red. We assume the high voltage cooked the module.
      Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
    • By Joe Marconi
      A first time customer, referred to us by another customer, brought her 2003 Honda V6 Accord to us for a vibration problem felt through the steering wheel only at idle, in drive, with the car stopped. The vibration is more prominent when she begins to turn the steering wheel. The vibration is slight, but it’s there.
       
      We did find a broken engine mount and replaced it. The customer says it’s “slightly” better, but the problem is not solved. We have gone thru the car with a fine tooth comb and found nothing else wrong. The car only has 50k on the clock and is in pristine condition and well maintained (I saw her records).
       
      She said the problem started a year ago when the Dealer did a Power Steering flush and Transmission flush.
       
      Does anyone have any ideas or help? Has anyone seen any issues with a vibration in the steering wheel after a Power Steering flush service was performed? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    • By Joe Marconi
      As TPMS sensors age, we are seeing more and more issues with seized sensors, that need to be replaced. The issue becomes explaining to the customer. The dissimiliar metals that are used in the core and stem are corroding, leading to the seizing after time. Also, people are putting the wrong caps on some sensors and that's an issue too when the cap seize.
       
      We have adopted a strick policy for some time now that when ever we service tires, tire repair or tire replacement we inform the customer PRIOR that the vehicle has TPMS, and that sometimes sensor or sensor may need to be replaced. We have brochures to help with the explanation. We also try to explain the relearn process and the re-program process. Not a lot of fun for us to be honest, it's takes time to do explain all this.
       
      This helps a lot, although we still get the occasional customer that says: "You touched it, you broke it, you buy it".
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×