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Personality clashes can be deadly!


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Have you ever had two techs that can’t stand each other? This can be serious and spread through your shop like a deadly virus. Other techs naturally will take sides and before you know you could a feud like the Hatfield’s and McCoy’s.

 

How would handle a situation like this?

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A few years ago we had one of our techs (Tech A) start hanging out with another tech (Tech B) and his wife. The end result was Tech A began an affair with Tech B's wife and then she moved out from Tech B and moved in with Tech A. We wound up with a situation of near fistecuffs. We set both of them down and told them that one of them had to go and that although Tech A had been there the longest that Tech B was the one on the higher morally ground (ofcourse if they hadn't of settled it we would have had to fire one of them). However, after some arguing Tech A quit. In a way that was unfortunate in that he was the best one of the two. If I had the situation you describe I would set them both down and tell them that one of them had to find another job or that I would be forced to either terminate one or both of them for cause.

 

Wow, your situation is a lot worse than I was speaking of. But, you are right, sometimes to minmize the negative impact or if the issues cannot be resolved, someone has to go.

 

This situation is about petty things, little things. It's hard for me to think that I would have to do something that drastic. What I fear is hurting shop morale, that will hurt business.

 

I have sat them down already, it was ok for a while, but I can see the war clouds forming again.

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Wow, your situation is a lot worse than I was speaking of. But, you are right, sometimes to minmize the negative impact or if the issues cannot be resolved, someone has to go.

 

This situation is about petty things, little things. It's hard for me to think that I would have to do something that drastic. What I fear is that the bickering may hurt shop morale, which in turn will hurt business.

 

I have sat them down already, it was ok for a while, but I can see the war clouds forming again.

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Have you ever had two techs that can't stand each other? This can be serious and spread through your shop like a deadly virus. Other techs naturally will take sides and before you know you could a feud like the Hatfield's and McCoy's.

 

How would handle a situation like this?

 

 

Impact wrenches at 20 paces... all Queensberry rules apply...

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Impact wrenches at 20 paces... all Queensberry rules apply...

 

You know, that works with our generation fine, but people today are sensitive and emotional. I tell my people to look past personalities and just get along with your fellow workers. It's a challenge and sometimes I feel I am running a nursery school for kids, instead of a company with adults.

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You know, that works with our generation fine, but people today are sensitive and emotional. I tell my people to look past personalities and just get along with your fellow workers. It's a challenge and sometimes I feel I am running a nursery school for kids, instead of a company with adults.

 

Another good point Joe, I hate sound like my parents but.... these kids today. ! ... !! I try to keep things light hearted.. it doesn't always work. Call it emotional call it EGO call it what you want, but you're right in the fact that it's like a couple of kids in a sand box fighting over the same toy.

 

I try to make a point of telling them... when you cross the threshold park your EGO there... picked it up when you go home. Gonzo

Edited by Gonzo
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Another good point Joe, I hate sound like my parents but.... these kids today. ! ... !! I try to keep things light hearted.. it doesn't always work. Call it emotional call it EGO call it what you want, but you're right in the fact that it's like a couple of kids in a sand box fighting over the same toy.

 

I try to make a point of telling them... when you cross the threshold park your EGO there... picked it up when you go home. Gonzo

 

I say the same thing. There is something I want to bring up. There may be reasons why a tech comes to work with issues (for example, a bad marriage). It's hard for the tech to shut off his/her emotions. And I think we all know the difference.

 

NOW, with that said, I think the the current generation is vastly different from the past generations, for a number of reasons. And I think it's tough for us old dogs understand that difference.

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Have you ever had two techs that can’t stand each other? This can be serious and spread through your shop like a deadly virus. Other techs naturally will take sides and before you know you could a feud like the Hatfield’s and McCoy’s.

 

How would handle a situation like this?

 

My general rule of thumb and policy is "You don't have to like each other to work together, but you do have to work together"

 

In my experience these situations generally arise from one of two reasons (sometimes both).

Work and Personal

Work : Generally if there is an issue it's either an employee isn't doing their job or someone "thinks" another employee isn't doing their job.

Both are fairly easy to handle if addressed. Shop policy and procedures will eliminate most of these. If you don't have one...make one!

 

Personal: This where it gets sticky. I genuinely want all of my employees to be successful, from the "greenhorn" to the manager so I will spend

a little more time addressing these. And the infamous "sit down" can help but I have taken it a step further because I think it sinks in a little better.

I will sit down with both employee's and mediate the issues (the best you can) and I will write down the issues and how they are going to be addressed

from this point on. I will make a copy for both and have both of them sign them. Something about writing it down and signing it makes it more real.

I will explain that ANY further disruptions will result in serious consequences because after all we have job to do and...

"You don't have to like each other to work together".

This process will weed out the person who genuinely wants their job and as unfortunate as it is you may lose the better of the two.

But at least you know who wants to work and is able to put their differences aside. It's better to have one and it be productive than two and

the whole shop going down with it.

With that being said, all issues need to be addressed as soon as possible. I apply the same policy as I do customer issues...immediately!

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You know, that works with our generation fine, but people today are sensitive and emotional. I tell my people to look past personalities and just get along with your fellow workers. It's a challenge and sometimes I feel I am running a nursery school for kids, instead of a company with adults.

By the way my wife laughs everytime I call it "Adult Daycare".

It REALLY feels like it some days...REALLY FEELS LIKE IT!

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