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Joe Marconi

You are higher that the dealer!

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I had a lady the other day, who drives a Caddy CTS, tell me the that our prices are higher than the dealer. We did a Mobile 1 oil change service (6quarts), checked it for a any needed service at HER request (all was ok), sold her a wheel alignment and 4 wheel balance because she was complaining of a hi-speed shimmy and that she has hit a lot of pot holes over the winter.

 

The price with tax; $202.56

 

How would you respond to this claim???

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