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You are higher that the dealer!


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The 2 CTS' I've had in my shop were both Leased vehicles. Of course, people who lease don't think they should have to perform any maintenance on their own dime. Your price is right in line with what it should be. There is no way the dealer would have been the same.

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I had a lady the other day, who drives a Caddy CTS, tell me the that our prices are higher than the dealer. We did a Mobile 1 oil change service (6quarts), checked it for a any needed service at HER request (all was ok), sold her a wheel alignment and 4 wheel balance because she was complaining of a hi-speed shimmy and that she has hit a lot of pot holes over the winter.

 

The price with tax; $202.56

 

How would you respond to this claim???

I always wondered.... why is it that "our" price has to be lower?? Who sets the standards?? the dealer?? Sometimes I think it's just the nature of some types of people to bitch at whatever the cost. I've got some stories on this subject... I should post one of them... AH, customers... gotta love em' Whether they are right or wrong... in their eyes your still wrong... another day in paradise.

Edited by Gonzo
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Gonzo, I had that argument at a shop owner's meeting a while back: Why do we have to be lower than the dealer? If they lower their prices, we have to lower our prices too? Is there some unwritten law?

 

Joe, this is one subject that I can't understand how it's even an issue. You know, sometimes, I "feel" like I'm higher than the dealer, but, I'm a specialty shop dealing mainly in odd ball electrical problems that no one else (even the dealer) doesn't want to touch. So how the hell is my price proactive with another shop... go figure.

 

My biggest argument is: If you go to hospital "A" and have a surgery... it's going to be one price.... go to hospital "B" and it's entirely different. Same with a dentist, a plumber, the way a bank charges for their services.... hell, even a resturaunt doesn't charge the same for the same meal. So why is it expected that we... the people that keep you moving on this countries roads and byways be "cheaper" just because "YOU" say so.

 

That's my story... and I'm stickin to it... LOL

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Joe, this is one subject that I can't understand how it's even an issue. You know, sometimes, I "feel" like I'm higher than the dealer, but, I'm a specialty shop dealing mainly in odd ball electrical problems that no one else (even the dealer) doesn't want to touch. So how the hell is my price proactive with another shop... go figure.

 

My biggest argument is: If you go to hospital "A" and have a surgery... it's going to be one price.... go to hospital "B" and it's entirely different. Same with a dentist, a plumber, the way a bank charges for their services.... hell, even a resturaunt doesn't charge the same for the same meal. So why is it expected that we... the people that keep you moving on this countries roads and byways be "cheaper" just because "YOU" say so.

 

That's my story... and I'm stickin to it... LOL

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That MOTOR Magazine article says it all. I laugh at the old saying: "I'm telling all my friends that you're a rip off... etc.. etc.." My answer... friends like that... keep em' and I'm happy they are not going to be coming to my shop. On the other hand... I'll bet your friends know exactly what your like... so it's no surprise to them that "you act like a jackass".... I'm grateful to them all.... glad your gone ... FOOL! !

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That MOTOR Magazine article says it all. I laugh at the old saying: "I'm telling all my friends that you're a rip off... etc.. etc.." My answer... friends like that... keep em' and I'm happy they are not going to be coming to my shop. On the other hand... I'll bet your friends know exactly what your like... so it's no surprise to them that "you act like a jackass".... I'm grateful to them all.... glad your gone ... FOOL! !

 

 

I tell them--[ opinions is like asshole's every one has one ! ] You are right most pepole are intelligent that they no thier is two sides to the story. I have had clients say I am going to tell so & so and so on . I have called some of the friends and they tell me we know how they are we still will be your clients.

Doesn't happen often , but when it does it is upsetting.

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I tell them--[ opinions is like asshole's every one has one ! ] You are right most pepole are intelligent that they no thier is two sides to the story. I have had clients say I am going to tell so & so and so on . I have called some of the friends and they tell me we know how they are we still will be your clients.

Doesn't happen often , but when it does it is upsetting.

 

 

So true Dan, I have to admit it doesn't happen often but when it does... it really gets to a guy. Over the years you get to the point you can almost tell when it's going to happen by the customers reactions... read my book... you'll see what I mean. Gonzo

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         3 comments
      Got your attention? Good. The truth is, there is no such thing as the perfect technician pay plan. There are countless ways to create any pay plan. I’ve heard all the claims and opinions, and to be honest, it’s getting a little frustrating. Claims that an hourly paid pay plan cannot motivate. That flat rate is the only way to truly get the most production from your technicians. And then there’s the hybrid performance-based pay plan that many claim is the best.
      At a recent industry event, a shop owner from the Midwest boasted about his flat-rate techs and insisted that this pay plan should be adopted by all shops across the country. When I informed him that in states like New York, you cannot pay flat-rate, he was shocked. “Then how do you motivate your techs” he asked me.
      I remember the day in 1986 when I hired the best technician who ever worked for me in my 41 years as an automotive shop owner. We’ll call him Hal. When Hal reviewed my pay plan for him, and the incentive bonus document, he stared at it for a minute, looked up, and said, “Joe, this looks good, but here’s what I want.” He then wrote on top of the document the weekly salary he wanted. It was a BIG number. He went on to say, “Joe, I need to take home a certain amount of money. I have a home, a wife, two kids, and my Harly Davidson. I will work hard and produce for you. I don’t need an incentive bonus to do my work.” And he did, for the next 30 years, until the day he retired.
      Everyone is entitled to their opinion. So, here’s mine. Money is a motivator, but not the only motivator, and not the best motivator either. We have all heard this scenario, “She quit ABC Auto Center, to get a job at XYZ Auto Repair, and she’s making less money now at XYZ!” We all know that people don’t leave companies, they leave the people they work for or work with.
      With all this said, I do believe that an incentive-based pay plan can work. However, I also believe that a technician must be paid a very good base wage that is commensurate with their ability, experience, and certifications. I also believe that in addition to money, there needs to be a great benefits package. But the icing on the cake in any pay plan is the culture, mission, and vision of the company, which takes strong leadership. And let’s not forget that motivation also comes from praise, recognition, respect, and when technicians know that their work matters.
      Rather than looking for that elusive perfect pay plan, sit down with your technician. Find out what motivates them. What their goals are. Why do they get out of bed in the morning? When you tie their goals with your goals, you will have one powerful pay plan.
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