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Expenses going up! Another reason to revisit your prices


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It's no secret that prices are going up around us. From food, gas, insurance, taxes, etc.  This is another reason to sit down and crunch your numbers.  Review your expenses line by line and see what increases you have had in the past few months, and the past year or so. 

Then,  make price increases in labor and other areas to ensure you are profitable. The long-term success of your business depends on it. 

What have you seen in your area with regard to increase in expenses? 

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