Quantcast
Jump to content


Coronavirus (COVID-19) - Car Count Help in Difficult Times


Recommended Posts



Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Topics

    • By spencersauto
      What's your houlr labor rate and where are you located? We're currently at $95 in Texas
    • By Joe Marconi
      For many shops, business during the winter can slow up due to a number of reasons.  What I have found that works is to schedule a flood of service reminders and past recommendations to go out during the months of Jan and Feb.  Maintaining touch with your existing customers is a great way to keep your shop top of mind, and it may just bring in a little extra work too.
      Any winter marketing tips to share? 
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      There is a large repair shop in the mid Atlantic states (they want to remain anonymous) that just formed an alliance with a local new car dealer to service their used cars.  I will change some of the details; a request from the shop owner. But, the story brings up a few interesting facts. And, the big news is: This shop is profiting from this relationship!
      The shop owner was approached by the GM of the dealer to service some of the used cars they have been taken in on trade and want to sell.  The dealer techs are not trained and not familiar with the different car lines, being a Chrysler-only dealership. Due to the shortage of cars these days, the dealer is taking in on trade, all makes and models and wants to sell the used cars. And we all know profitable used cars are. 
      The repair shop performs a multipoint, which they get paid for,  and then they do many of the services and repairs, which includes tires, brakes, wheel alignments, oil changes, air and cabin filters, wipers and other simple services. Most of the cars are newer cars, and the work can be done by a GS tech.
      I don't know the pricing, sorry.  But, I am interested to see where this goes.  
      Imagine, a new car dealer asking an independent repair shop to service and repair their used car fleet???
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      One of the lessons from COVID is for repair shops to have a strong cash reserve.  Shop owners need to budget their money each week, and allocate money to different bank accounts, such as payroll, operating expenses, taxes, etc.
      Another account I would recommend is to have a Cash Reserve account, where money is allocating each week, and not touched unless their is a emergency, such as an economic downturn and or if an economic emergency occurs in your area or with your company. 
      While no one could have predicted the affects from COVID 19, I think we can all agree that being cash strong is a viable strategy.
      You should have anywhere from 3 to 6 months of covered expenses in a separate bank account.  I know, I know....it's a lot of money. Start slow and build each week. Anything set aside is better than nothing. 
      Of course, to have a reserve means that you need to have the profit to put away. Right?  Well, another reason to know your numbers, revisit your pricing and make sure your labor rate is enough to support your payroll, operating expenses and have enough left over to set aside money for the unexpected.
      Trust me, you'll be glad you did. 
       
    • By carmcapriotto
      Key Talking Points
      Justin Fricke, CarTime Auto Center, Dundas, MN
      Stocks around 100 cars on lot for used car business in the same building The car buying experience has changed- the market isn’t full of new vehicles anymore, prices continue to increase month to month Justin started as a technician and is now part-owner Program through junior and senior high schools called Career Tech Education- job fair day of different businesses with displays. As a business, go to schools and ask about their programs available. Consider field trip to the shop Where do kids fit? Stereotypes around the trades need to be broken in school. Don’t push the kids that are the “bad students” into the trades. It is no longer a secondary career path. Also has detail shop- $200 for full detailing inside and out Connect with the show:
      Aftermarket Radio Network
      Subscribe on YouTube
      Visit us on the Web
      Follow on Facebook
      Become an Insider
      Buy me a coffee
      Important Books
      Check out today's partner:

      Dorman gives people greater freedom to fix vehicles by constantly developing new repair solutions that put owners and technicians first. By always innovating, Dorman has led the way in growing the aftermarket. Here you will see a few examples of a Dorman OE Fix. An OE FIX is a Dorman repair solution you can’t get from the original equipment manufacturer. It means they found a situation where they believe the OEM wasn’t giving repair professionals what they wanted, so we fixed it. Everything Dorman does is centered around providing customer value, both in the quality of products, and the creativity of solutions. Our engineers and designers go out of their way to save repair technicians time and save vehicle owners money. Want to really go under the hood? Take the Dorman Virtual Tour at www.DormanProducts.com/Tour

      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By Joe Marconi
      January 2020 started without a hitch. We hit our sales and profit goals in textbook fashion. However, by the end of February, it was obvious that something wasn’t right. Sales for the month dipped by more than 30 percent. It was devastating. What we didn’t realize was that this was just the beginning of even greater losses. By the time Governor Cuomo of New York issued the stay-at-home order on March 22, sales had dropped 75 percent. With most of the country in lock-down, I didn’t know what to fear more—the coronavirus or the impending financial disaster the world was about to endure.  
      Before we go on, it’s important that we all remember those that have lost their lives due to COVID-19.  As in any crisis, there will be suffering. However, as a society, we must not dwell on it or let the crisis beat us. We must find a way to fight it and succeed.  
      When the impact of the virus first hit, emotions filled my mind every waking moment, mostly due to the uncertainty of the situation. Then, reality set in and all I could think about was my obligation to others. As an essential part of the community and the nation, it was my obligation to keep the doors open and be there to make sure that those that needed to get to work, could. If we were to win, survive and thrive, we had to create a winning environment. That meant that I had to elevate my leadership to a new level, put the health and welfare of my staff before anything else and realign my goals. In the coming days and weeks, I would get a working man’s PhD on how to win in times of crisis. 
      The first lesson learned in all this is to have the right mindset. We can’t look backward in time or wait around for a return to what we perceived was once normal. Looking forward and building a new future is all that matters. If you tell yourself, “the sky is falling.” It will.  Negativity spreads like a virus and infects everyone around you. Your mind shuts down in panic mode, clouding your judgment and mentally and physically paralyzing you. You must remain mentally strong and positive, even when you know the brutal facts of the situation. This is crucial. You, the leader of your shop, cannot lead others if you show fear and negativity. Be human, show emotions, but have the mental fortitude and show your team that we will get through this crisis. 
      The next lesson is to make sure you have the right people around you. A strong team with the right culture is important in business. In times of crisis, it’s the difference between success and failure. As the weeks unfolded, it became clear to me who my leaders were. It would be those employees that I would turn to in order to maintain morale and lift everyone’s spirit. Leaders cannot succeed without having the right team around them. Take a look around you. Do you have the best employees with the right attitude? If not, begin the recruiting process today. 
      Realigning my goals and understanding my new key performance numbers was next up. My 2020 business plan, created in December 2019, had little meaning by mid-March. I am not admitting defeat for the year by any means. Rather, we now have new objectives and a clean slate. From this point on, it is critical that we remain profitable: watching every expense, tracking production, keeping payroll within budget, and building for the future. The past is the past, it cannot be changed. What we have now is the opportunity to make each day better than the day before. 
      Perhaps the biggest lesson learned was more of reminder than a lesson. It’s that above everything else, people come first.  All the planning, goal setting, marketing and number crunching mean nothing unless you understand that you, as a shop owner, have the power to achieve great things by your words and actions. Yes, it all goes back to leadership and understanding your obligation you have to others. All of us will have different lessons learned from crisis.  Which means, there is great opportunity on the horizon. Use those lesson to make your tomorrow better than yesterday. 
      My hope is that by the time you read this article, COVID-19 will be well under control.  Human interaction is crucial to our overall well-being. We need not only, the emotional touch of another person, but also the physical touch of others.  While Facetime and Zoom will get us through, it will never replace a good old fashion handshake and a hug. 
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on June 5th, 2020


      View full article
    • By Mark Johnson
      Are you a Iowa shop owner? If you have been affected by COVID-19, have 2-25 employees and have a location in the state you can get a grant of between $5,000 and $25,000 from the Iowa Small Business Relief Grant Program. (If you are not from Iowa please tell friend from the state)   YOU MUST APPLY NOW! (Deadline is March 31, 2020)   So what information do you need?   A LOT!   ●   Most recent Income Statement ●   Revenue Loss Analysis ●   Most recent Balance Sheet ●   Payroll Schedule And Analysis ●   Funds utilization report ●   Fill out All Paperwork   You need to apply now because applications close March 31, 2020.   This is FREE money, don't let it pass.

      We are currently helping business owners to access this grant.   For more info please call us at 1954-324-0803 or book an appointment at https://calendly.com/markjohnsontaxplanner/45min
      View full article
    • By Joe Marconi
      January 2020 started without a hitch. We hit our sales and profit goals in textbook fashion. However, by the end of February, it was obvious that something wasn’t right. Sales for the month dipped by more than 30 percent. It was devastating. What we didn’t realize was that this was just the beginning of even greater losses. By the time Governor Cuomo of New York issued the stay-at-home order on March 22, sales had dropped 75 percent. With most of the country in lock-down, I didn’t know what to fear more—the coronavirus or the impending financial disaster the world was about to endure.  
      Before we go on, it’s important that we all remember those that have lost their lives due to COVID-19.  As in any crisis, there will be suffering. However, as a society, we must not dwell on it or let the crisis beat us. We must find a way to fight it and succeed.  
      When the impact of the virus first hit, emotions filled my mind every waking moment, mostly due to the uncertainty of the situation. Then, reality set in and all I could think about was my obligation to others. As an essential part of the community and the nation, it was my obligation to keep the doors open and be there to make sure that those that needed to get to work, could. If we were to win, survive and thrive, we had to create a winning environment. That meant that I had to elevate my leadership to a new level, put the health and welfare of my staff before anything else and realign my goals. In the coming days and weeks, I would get a working man’s PhD on how to win in times of crisis. 
      The first lesson learned in all this is to have the right mindset. We can’t look backward in time or wait around for a return to what we perceived was once normal. Looking forward and building a new future is all that matters. If you tell yourself, “the sky is falling.” It will.  Negativity spreads like a virus and infects everyone around you. Your mind shuts down in panic mode, clouding your judgment and mentally and physically paralyzing you. You must remain mentally strong and positive, even when you know the brutal facts of the situation. This is crucial. You, the leader of your shop, cannot lead others if you show fear and negativity. Be human, show emotions, but have the mental fortitude and show your team that we will get through this crisis. 
      The next lesson is to make sure you have the right people around you. A strong team with the right culture is important in business. In times of crisis, it’s the difference between success and failure. As the weeks unfolded, it became clear to me who my leaders were. It would be those employees that I would turn to in order to maintain morale and lift everyone’s spirit. Leaders cannot succeed without having the right team around them. Take a look around you. Do you have the best employees with the right attitude? If not, begin the recruiting process today. 
      Realigning my goals and understanding my new key performance numbers was next up. My 2020 business plan, created in December 2019, had little meaning by mid-March. I am not admitting defeat for the year by any means. Rather, we now have new objectives and a clean slate. From this point on, it is critical that we remain profitable: watching every expense, tracking production, keeping payroll within budget, and building for the future. The past is the past, it cannot be changed. What we have now is the opportunity to make each day better than the day before. 
      Perhaps the biggest lesson learned was more of reminder than a lesson. It’s that above everything else, people come first.  All the planning, goal setting, marketing and number crunching mean nothing unless you understand that you, as a shop owner, have the power to achieve great things by your words and actions. Yes, it all goes back to leadership and understanding your obligation you have to others. All of us will have different lessons learned from crisis.  Which means, there is great opportunity on the horizon. Use those lesson to make your tomorrow better than yesterday. 
      My hope is that by the time you read this article, COVID-19 will be well under control.  Human interaction is crucial to our overall well-being. We need not only, the emotional touch of another person, but also the physical touch of others.  While Facetime and Zoom will get us through, it will never replace a good old fashion handshake and a hug. 
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on June 5th, 2020

    • By Joe Marconi
      Due to COVID-19, many repair shops experienced a severe economic downturn, some with a drop in sales over 50%.  Without a strong cash reserve and/or SBA funding help, many shops would have gone under. 
      My 40 years as a shop owner has taught me to always have a cash reserve.  However, never would I have ever imagined a downturn like the one with COVID-19.
      So, how do we plan for the next financial crisis.  And, it will happen. Perhaps not as bad as the the virus crisis, but it will happen.
      Here are a few things to consider: Have a separate, and hard to access, cash reserve bank account that has least two months of expenses. Also, secure a line of credit for at least one to two months of expenses.  Also, know your numbers, keep payroll in line, and make sure your prices are fair to you too, not just your customers.  Keep in good standing with all your vendors and keep your credit score high! 
      The bottom line here, is truly the bottom line.  To weather the next financial downturn, you need a strong balance sheet and net profit to the bottom line.
      What other strategies are you considering or implementing? 
    • By Joe Marconi
      A ride to the Mall with my wife today (yes, I went to the Mall, got a problem?) gave me assurance that things are really getting back to normal. The stores were full, the roads were packed and expect for the masks people are wearing, you would think it's just another ordinary summer weekend! 
       
  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...