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Joe Marconi

Openbay debuts Virtual auto Service Advisor?

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Below is a link to an article about Obenbay's debut with an online virtual service advisor. Is this the future?  Or will technology remove that personal touch.  For me, someone that has built a business on strong relationships and human customer touch points, this is something I am not sure of.  But then again, what about the millennials and the Z generation?  

https://www.openbay.com/blog/openbay-launches-industry-first-artificial-intelligence-powered-automotive-service-advisor/

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