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Joe Marconi

Your work is not over after you hire a tech or service advisor

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You spend a lot of time and money finding an hiring an employee. Whether it be a technician, service advisor or office worker.  However, the real work to ensure that the new employee is up and running begins when you hire that person.  Don't make the mistake of thinking that a new-hire can be put to work without an orientation period. No matter how experienced someone may be, take the time to slowly acclimate that person to your shop, your other employees and your systems and procedures. The time you take in the beginning will help to create a long-lasting employee relationship. 

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      Source: Advance Auto Parts, Inc.
      Media Relations:
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      T: (540) 589-8102
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      Investor Relations:
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