Quantcast
Jump to content


Joe Marconi

Your work is not over after you hire a tech or service advisor

Recommended Posts

You spend a lot of time and money finding an hiring an employee. Whether it be a technician, service advisor or office worker.  However, the real work to ensure that the new employee is up and running begins when you hire that person.  Don't make the mistake of thinking that a new-hire can be put to work without an orientation period. No matter how experienced someone may be, take the time to slowly acclimate that person to your shop, your other employees and your systems and procedures. The time you take in the beginning will help to create a long-lasting employee relationship. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Topics

    • By MINI4U
      Just wondering how many lifts do other shops have per tech? We have 5 lifts with 3 &1/2 techs and we still need more. To add more lifts we need a expansion and then we need to try to find a quality tech. 
    • By gary farber
      will bolt on work with ro writer
    • By Dnzauto
      Hi everyone,
       
      did any of the shops that started the  CARFAX Service Shop program ever read the TERMS ??????  ( https://service.carfax.com/csn/csnTerms )    So, basically, they are collecting VIN & Email ( meaning they can target the vehicle make/model/year/valu etc AND customer contact -email ).....  they can sell this info to competition ; especially to brand specific shops!!!! or dealerships !!!!!    on top of it ... they can STOP The free service ANYTIME they like, and keep using all the data they gathered!   anyone else see a problem with all this and other stupid clauses ( ie : no jury , no class action ..) ???   
      CARFAX® Service Network.pdf
    • By Joe Marconi
      Below is a link to an article about Obenbay's debut with an online virtual service advisor. Is this the future?  Or will technology remove that personal touch.  For me, someone that has built a business on strong relationships and human customer touch points, this is something I am not sure of.  But then again, what about the millennials and the Z generation?  
      https://www.openbay.com/blog/openbay-launches-industry-first-artificial-intelligence-powered-automotive-service-advisor/
    • By alfredauto
      So its been a little slow lately so I visited every garage around to see what I'm doing wrong. What I found got me thinking, just about everyone had the same empty parking lot as me. Made me feel better. Some places had million plus $$ renovations since the last time I had visited, they have shops and customer areas way nicer than I can afford without going into huge debt. To be honest it made me feel a little insecure. My waiting room is clean but dated, my shop is also clean and modern but the building is 70 yrs old, so its about as good as its going to be without spending big money. I resigned myself to keep offering the best customer service possible as that's what I feel really matters. I can't compete in the spend more money game, some of these guys can easily out do me every time.
       
      What are your thoughts? Do you think customers are attracted to brand new facilities or can they be satisfied with just good service alone?
  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By Joe Marconi
      Below is a link to an article in Ratchet and Wrench Magazine about what Valvoline is doing about the tech shortage.  The aftermarket needs to look at social media and other unconventional ways to bring techs to our industry. 
      https://www.ratchetandwrench.com/articles/7471-Valvoline-launches-auto-career-platform
    • By Joe Marconi
      Perhaps the worst time to look to hire a technician, is when we lose one. At that point we go into “Crisis Hire” mode. We most often settle for anyone, rather than taking our time to find the right person.
       
      We need to take a lesson from large organizations and sports teams. Their strategy? They continually recruit. I did not say continually hire, I said continually recruit.
       
      You need to be on the look out for the talent in your community. Find where the best of the best are working now. Reach out to these people, get to know them.
       
      Make is part of your overall business plan to stay in touch with trade schools, the military for returning vets, and any other employee agencies. Identify key people in your local auto community and ask questions; where are the best technicians? How can I contact this person? Who knows this superstar tech?
       
      In other words, allocate a significant portion of your time in the area of recruiting. Your goal is to have people in the pipe line. So when you lose an employee you have a list of contacts to reach out to.
       
      In the book “Work Rules”, a book about Google and its employee strategies, the author states that Google follows this rule: “Hiring is the single most important activity in any organization"
    • By Joe Marconi
      One thing I see different with young techs today from years back is the lack of hands-on experience. In my era, mechanics got their start pumping gas, working with their father on the family car and helping friends. By the time you landed a job in a garage, you had the basics under your belt.
       
      I am firm believer in hiring entry level techs, always have been. I contact the trade schools; Lincoln Technical, Universal Technical Institute, etc. I have to tell you, the last few years have been a bit discouraging.
       
      When I look at their resumes I am shocked that they never worked in a repair shop. Oh, they have worked as a camp counselor, at the local deli, at Rite Aid and Apple Bees. But no hands on mechanical work? Some of them never worked on car other than what was required at school.
       
      These schools are pumping out techs by the thousands. Are they all like this, and where are they too?
       
      Our future is dependent on a strong entry level workforce. I think we need to rethink the process. I also think that trade schools should adopt a concept similar to the medical field. Nurses and doctors must go thru mandatory work at hospitals while still in school and then go thru internship programs. You would never put a doctor in an operating room, fresh out of Med School with no hands-on experience. Would you?
       
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...