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Joe Marconi

Your work is not over after you hire a tech or service advisor

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You spend a lot of time and money finding an hiring an employee. Whether it be a technician, service advisor or office worker.  However, the real work to ensure that the new employee is up and running begins when you hire that person.  Don't make the mistake of thinking that a new-hire can be put to work without an orientation period. No matter how experienced someone may be, take the time to slowly acclimate that person to your shop, your other employees and your systems and procedures. The time you take in the beginning will help to create a long-lasting employee relationship. 

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      First, let me clarify one thing: I AM NOT THE EXPERT.  But there are  things about the PPP that concern me. Such as this quote fron the SBA:  "Forgeven amounts will be considerded income for federal tax purposes." So, if you get a forgiven loan in the amount of 100,000- that will be added as income? 
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      Below is a link to an article in Ratchet and Wrench Magazine about what Valvoline is doing about the tech shortage.  The aftermarket needs to look at social media and other unconventional ways to bring techs to our industry. 
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