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Joe Marconi

Your work is not over after you hire a tech or service advisor

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You spend a lot of time and money finding an hiring an employee. Whether it be a technician, service advisor or office worker.  However, the real work to ensure that the new employee is up and running begins when you hire that person.  Don't make the mistake of thinking that a new-hire can be put to work without an orientation period. No matter how experienced someone may be, take the time to slowly acclimate that person to your shop, your other employees and your systems and procedures. The time you take in the beginning will help to create a long-lasting employee relationship. 

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      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on September 5th, 2019


      View full article
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      I'm curious to hear about pay structures out there that are successful.  We pay all of our techs hourly, regardless of what is billed, and then offer a bonus program based on productivity each week.  Ie, they bill 60% of the time they were paid for, they get $xx additional dollars per hour, bill 70%, get $x, bill 80%, get $x etc etc.
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      “Since 1990, Bob Cooper has been the president of Elite (www.EliteWorldwide.com), a company that strives to help shop owners reach their goals and live happier lives, while elevating the industry at the same time. The company offers the industry’s #1 peer group of 90 successful shop owners, training and coaching from top shop owners, service advisor training, along with online and in-class sales, marketing and shop management courses. You can contact Elite at [email protected], or by calling 800-204-3548."

      View full article


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    • By Joe Marconi
      Below is a link to an article in Ratchet and Wrench Magazine about what Valvoline is doing about the tech shortage.  The aftermarket needs to look at social media and other unconventional ways to bring techs to our industry. 
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      Perhaps the worst time to look to hire a technician, is when we lose one. At that point we go into “Crisis Hire” mode. We most often settle for anyone, rather than taking our time to find the right person.
       
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      In the book “Work Rules”, a book about Google and its employee strategies, the author states that Google follows this rule: “Hiring is the single most important activity in any organization"
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      One thing I see different with young techs today from years back is the lack of hands-on experience. In my era, mechanics got their start pumping gas, working with their father on the family car and helping friends. By the time you landed a job in a garage, you had the basics under your belt.
       
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      These schools are pumping out techs by the thousands. Are they all like this, and where are they too?
       
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