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bantar

Paint Experts - Need help with Damage Claim

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Posted (edited)

I had a customer claim that we damaged his car in multiple spots on the driver side rocker panel during an oil change.   We don't lift vehicles for oil changes, so at best, the closest we come to touching the rocker panels is entering the vehicle.   One of our shoes might get caught when entering.   This is an elderly gentleman and I do think he's being honest, but also think he is confused.    He saw some of our guys milling about near his car (actually working on computer in the bay) and thought they were looking at some damage on his car.   So, when he got home, he inspected it thoroughly.  This guy waxes / polishes his car daily, but has problems bending over anyway, so I don't think he's paid strict attention to the rocker panel.  In fact, he blamed us for some road tar that we were able to scrape off.   Not sure that his vision is great either.   But he loves his car.

In our observation, it looks like a scuff mark maybe from hitting rubber debris on the road, but at the same time, it appears to be under the clear coat as it won't rub off.   See the attached pictures.  I'm hoping someone that knows paint might be able shed some light on what I'm seeing.   We've only taken pictures and tried to rub it off with fingers and fingernails.  We have not tried any solvents or cleaners.   I'm sure he would bring the car back for another inspection.

2013 Mustang Scuff 1.jpg

Edited by bantar

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