Quantcast
Jump to content


brake pad abutment shims


Recommended Posts

What are you guys using as lubrication between the abutment shims and the caliper bracket.  I live in the rust belt and the main cause of premature brake pad wear here is frozen pads.  I was using a cold galvanize corrosion inhibitor spray but it didn't work well at all(maybe a year).  Now I'm using green grease, and it has been working better but I'm starting to see cars coming back with sticking pads after like 2 years.  MOPAR 04796269 works really well but it costs more then caviar.  Just curious if there is something affordable out there that won't have me reaching for the file every brake job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do use sil-glyde on all the rubber parts but wanted something a little more robust for the metal parts that trap salt water and corrode.  I'm looking at Jet-Lube Marine Moly 65005 or MolyKote 3400A.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have been seeing pretty good results with a generous dose of Permatex Ceramic Brake Lube.  We are in Michigan.  Here's a link.  NAPA, O'reilly, seems like everyone has it - but prices are all over!  https://www.permatex.com/products/lubricants/specialty-lubricants-brakes/permatex-ceramic-extreme-brake-parts-lubricant-2/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

    • By Joe Marconi in Joe's Blog
         5
      Typically, when productivity suffers, the shop owner or manager directs their attention to the technicians. Are they doing all they can do to maintain high billable hours? Are they as efficient as they can be?  Is there time being wasted throughout the technician’s day? 
      All these reasons factor into production problems, but before we point fingers at the technicians, let’s consider a few other factors.
      Are estimates being written properly? Are labor testing and inspections being billed out correctly? Are you charging enough for testing and inspecting, especially for highly specialized electrical, on-board computer issues, and other complex drivability work?  Is there a clear workflow process everyone follows that details every step from the write-up to vehicle delivery? Do you track comebacks, and is that affecting production?  Is the shop layout not conducive to high production? For example, is it unorganized, where shop tools, technical information, and equipment are not easily accessible to every technician?  Are you charging the correct labor rate and allowing for variables such as rust, vehicle age, and the fact that most labor guides are wrong? Also, is there effective communication between the tech and the service advisor to ensure that extra labor time is accounted for and billed to the customer? These are a few of the top reasons for low productivity problems. There are others, but the main point is to look at the entire operation. Productivity is a team effort.  Blaming the techs or other staff members does not get to the root cause in most cases.
      Maintaining adequate production levels is the responsibility of management to create the processes that will lead to high production while holding everyone accountable. 
  • Similar Topics



  • By nptrb, in Automotive Industry,

    By nptrb, in Automotive Industry,

  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...