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flacvabeach

State Inspection Fee Increase

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Virginia's Governor Northam signed a bill into law that increases the fee shops can charge for the annual safety inspection from $16 to $20.  This was made possible through a lot of hard work and lobbying by the Virginia Automotive Association.  You can learn more about VAA at vaauto.org.  Done properly, Virginia's inspection process takes about 45 minutes per car,  so shops are still running a deficit, but it's a long-awaited improvement.

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    • By flacvabeach
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      If any of you live in Virginia, I urge you to contact our legislators and tell them how you feel about this  Here are key email addresses:
      [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] Thanks,
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      As a growing number of states issue emergency orders to close non-essential businesses, the U.S. government has issued guidance declaring that automotive repair and maintenance are “essential” functions.     
      A March 19 memo from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) includes automotive repair and maintenance employees in a list of “essential critical infrastructure workers.”
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      As a growing number of states issue emergency orders to close non-essential businesses, the U.S. government has issued guidance declaring that automotive repair and maintenance are “essential” functions.     
      A March 19 memo from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) includes automotive repair and maintenance employees in a list of “essential critical infrastructure workers.”
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      For additional information, contact Aaron Lowe, senior vice president, government and regulatory affairs, at [email protected] or Tom Tucker, director, state affairs, at [email protected]
      Source: https://www.counterman.com/automotive-repair-service-deemed-essential/


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