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Joe Marconi

Shop Owners: Book the next appointment!

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If there is one thing that doctors and dentists do very well, it's that they book the next appointment for their clientele. I have heard every excuse possible why many auto repair shops don’t do this.  But the fact remains that everyone in your shop today will need future service and repairs. And the question is, “Are they coming back to you.”

Another reason for booking the next appointment is that there are times when not all the recommended services were done today. Some were postponed due to budget and prioritizing what’s most important.  So, before that customer leaves, make sure the customer commits to a future date to have the work done. After all, why did you recommend it in the first place?

Car delivery is the time to review all the work done today, continue to build the relationship and to inform your customers of upcoming work and services. But don’t leave it to chance that the customer will remember. Be proactive, discuss future dates and put those dates in your calendar.  

Lastly, call customers a few days before the appointment as a reminder. If the appointment has to be moved, then move it.

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    • By Joe Marconi
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    • By Joe Marconi
      In my opinion, competition is actually good for the industry, and good for your repair shop too.  It keeps us focused and forces us to maintain pace with other repair shops.  It drives us to take a look at our own business to see where and how we can make improvements.
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      We sell service, not products. Yes, we sell water pumps, brake pads and air filters. And yes, those are products. But it’s the service we sell, the customer experience, which lives on well beyond the customer leaves your shop.

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      But, what does live on is the customer experience. The better the experience, the more likely the customer will return to you.  So focus on the customer experience, not the products you install.



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