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It's Doing The Same Thing --- Is it really????


Gonzo

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It’s Doing the Same Thing
 
 
        Being on the mechanic's side of the counter, I've 
often wondered what does "the same thing" really mean? 
 
    Nearly every time a customer comes up to the service 
counter, who has no background in automotive repair, or 
any idea at all on how repairs are made and what's all 
involved, but tells me, “It’s doing the same thing”,  I have 
to ask myself… “How do they know?”  Is it really doing exactly 
the same thing?  Funny, how it turns out (99.9% of the time),
 that it’s NOT doing the same thing.  
 
tp.gif       I hear this rhetoric from customers now and then, but when my wife starts in on me with the good ol' 'It's doing the same thing', now I'm more than a little curious.  Here's an example. 
 
    We were about to head on our vacation when the bulb warning light on the dash came on indicating one of the rear lights was out.  It was a side marker light on the driver’s side of the car. Easily changed and taken care of, and with all the commotion and last minute preparations, the warning light problem became a distant memory. So off we went on our little adventure.
 
tp.gif    Several states and hundreds of miles later while the wife was driving, and I was taking a nap, she nudges me and says, “It’s doing the same thing”. 
 
tp.gif       Now I understand there is always the possibility that it really is doing the same thing, but really my dear … you’re married to a mechanic. Can we at least re-think how to inform me of such things?  Yes, the light on the dash is “doing the same thing”, but let’s try rephrasing it to the guy just waking up from a pleasant-no-stress-day-off.  How about: “The warning light is back on, dear.”  At least that way I won’t feel like I’m back at the shop trying to decipher the latest “doing the same thing” dilemma. I’m on vacation for heaven’s sake! 
 
        At the next stop I performed the usual "walk around" and noticed the passenger side marker light that was out this time.   Not to be outwitted by a little warning light, I gave the lens a little tap. Low and behold, the filament lit up, and off we went.
 
        As we traveled down the road I had plenty of time to ponder how many times I’ve heard the phrase, “Doing the same thing”.  Over the years I’ve seen this escalate into complete madness at the front counter or end up with a tap on a bulb lens.  As in my wife’s case, the dash warning light could only indicate that a bulb was out and which end of the car it was.  However, when a customer lays down a chunk of their hard earned cash their interpretation doesn’t include the possibility of multiple issues controlled by the same warning light. From their perspective, it's doing the same thing.  
 
             A few weeks ago I had a 1995 Saturn in the shop that had been all over town, as well as to every relative who owned a tool box.  No one seemed able to get the air conditioning to cool.  Part after part was changed, but still no cold air.  When I finally had a crack at it I was surprised at what I found.  The connector for the A/C compressor was exactly the same style and type as the low coolant level sensor mounted in the over-flow bottle.  Somebody had flip-flopped the connectors.  Once I found the problem the cure was simple… just reverse the connectors and “Ta-Da” cold air.  All the functions were working, cooling fan, line pressure, vent temperature, everything was great.  Even the “low coolant” light was operating correctly.  
 
             But where would this story be without a 'It's doing the same thing' scenario.
 
        A few weeks later I get a call, you guessed it… “Doing the same thing”.  Now, I’m no dummy, I know what they meant.  They're actually telling me that it's not making cold air again.  I informed them it was probably leaking refrigerant or something like that, but I seriously doubt somebody switched the connectors again.  They weren’t buying that, they kept insisting that it’s doing exactly the same thing as before. Even after reading the description of the repair on the invoice, and telling me they totally understood it… they still can't break away from the common reply... it's “Doing the same thing”. 
 
           This follows right along with the typical scenario right after changing out a blower motor for a customer and a week later they're back because their air conditioning isn’t cold. I’ll ask, “When did you notice the air wasn’t cold?”   The usual answer, “Right after you changed the blower motor.” 
 
       I should have a guy in the background with a drum set patiently waiting for me to ask, "So when did you notice the problem?" and when the customer delivers the inevitable punch line, the drummer could bang out the classic drum roll-rim tap and cymbal crash.  A priceless moment for every counter person.  
 
             The way I see it, the consumer brought their car into a repair shop for a professional evaluation of a problem, and expect to never see a related or similar problem ever again.  But, as soon as the work is done and some other problem creeps up that seems to be more than a little bit like what they just had repaired, the mechanic is soon to have the same thing happen again. 
 
              The fact that there are other things that can go wrong can be a huge mountain to climb. But, with some diplomacy, and tact, a good counterman can get through these situations.  One thing for sure, as the mechanic, you've got to get in there and solve the problem no matter if it's the same thing or not.  Generally, (from my past experiences) the same thing is hardly ever the 'same thing'.  The Saturn, was a faulty compressor due to the fact the last shop didn't add enough oil to the compressor, the replaced blower motor problem, was a faulty low pressure switch, and the wife's car, well... she hasn't had to tap on the bulb lens ever since.  
 
                But to me.... it's all the same thing.  

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LOL , just like the dreaded check engine light you diagnosed and fixed last year ! lol...  If the customers only knew the monitor and checks these sophisticated machines they drive around actually go through and the amazing number of things that can set this light off , they themselves may come to the conclusion they may have another problem , not the same problem.. There only seems to be two lights that resonate to the average operator. One the dreaded tire pressure light and the second that funny little thing that looks like a gas pump LOL !!!! 😜

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After reading this I had to share a story my dad told me many times. He was an electrical engineer that started a side business repairing TVs back in the 70's. He gave it up after a few years because he got tired of hearing "it's doing the same thing". He would repair a set with no picture, then within a short period of time, he would get the "it's doing the same thing" call. When he asked what that was, they would say that there was no sound. Being a very logical based engineer, it drove him crazy.

Scott 

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

    • By Joe Marconi in Joe's Blog
         4
      Typically, when productivity suffers, the shop owner or manager directs their attention to the technicians. Are they doing all they can do to maintain high billable hours? Are they as efficient as they can be?  Is there time being wasted throughout the technician’s day? 
      All these reasons factor into production problems, but before we point fingers at the technicians, let’s consider a few other factors.
      Are estimates being written properly? Are labor testing and inspections being billed out correctly? Are you charging enough for testing and inspecting, especially for highly specialized electrical, on-board computer issues, and other complex drivability work?  Is there a clear workflow process everyone follows that details every step from the write-up to vehicle delivery? Do you track comebacks, and is that affecting production?  Is the shop layout not conducive to high production? For example, is it unorganized, where shop tools, technical information, and equipment are not easily accessible to every technician?  Are you charging the correct labor rate and allowing for variables such as rust, vehicle age, and the fact that most labor guides are wrong? Also, is there effective communication between the tech and the service advisor to ensure that extra labor time is accounted for and billed to the customer? These are a few of the top reasons for low productivity problems. There are others, but the main point is to look at the entire operation. Productivity is a team effort.  Blaming the techs or other staff members does not get to the root cause in most cases.
      Maintaining adequate production levels is the responsibility of management to create the processes that will lead to high production while holding everyone accountable. 
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