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Hope everyone is having good week with great sales. I am in the process of renegotiating my employee’s uniform contract. It is sorta the same old thing start low then get higher. Could I get some feedback on how you guys are handling this. I have looked at buying uni’s for my guys. In my area it is expensive and they do not want to update my guys. Just lchecking some ideas . Thanks guys. David

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