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I am concerned that I may have an employee using drugs. We have found two plastic needle covers for a syringe. I have not noticed any unusual behavior or anything missing. Has anyone dealt with this before. Any advice? Is it possible to have a drug user that is maintaining like House on TV?

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      When it comes to keeping your employees operating at peak performance, I am sure you will agree that training is critical. Accordingly, I felt it would be appropriate for me to provide you with what Elite feels to be the most important considerations when it comes to training your team.
      First of all, here in the U.S. both physicians and attorneys are required to participate in continued education, and I feel your team members should be required as well. It is for this reason that I would strongly encourage you to have a policy in place that mandates that as a condition of ongoing employment, each year your technicians will need to complete (as an example) at least 40 hours of training, and your advisors will need to complete at least 8 hours of training. In all cases, the training will need to be company approved. 
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