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xrac

DONATIONS IN THE WAKE OF THE HURRICANES

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For those of you who are seeking donations or giving donations for the hurricane victims I urge everyone to seek out charities that are effective at helping the victims. The more of your dollar that actually goes to aid the victims and the less that goes to fund the organization's operation the better.  A good starting point would be Charity Navigator.  Personally I favor organizations such as Samaritan's Purse or the Salvation Army over the American Red Cross. 

 

https://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=content.view&cpid=5239&order=charity

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      Click here to view the article


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