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Joe Marconi

A proactive Sales tip to improve customer retention and car counts

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Back in the late 1990’s, I began to get concerned about car counts and customer retention. Around that time, cars were beginning to become more reliable and many of the services and tune up components we once counted on, were going away.

I also started to notice that many customers were going to the quick lubes for their oil changes.  To be honest, I couldn’t blame them.  There was a time when I did not offer any “wait” service and I was never concerned about the oil change business.

That all changed.  I began an all-out blitz to get my customers coming back to me for their next oil change.  I especially made it a point to inform customers of their next appointment when we did not due their last oil change.  I just informed them of their next service date and made sure they received a service reminder. 

The plan took time, but it worked. It increased car counts and customer retention improved. We still use this strategy to this day.

Make sure you speak to all customers at car delivery about their next service. Book it in your calendar.  And if the car was not in for an oil change, check the oil sticker, enter the date in your CRM reminder system, and assume that the customer wants to return to you.

We need to be proactive these days. We cannot wait for the phone to ring, we have to make it ring!

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