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The Dangers Of Sweating Slab Syndrome

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Sweating Slab Syndrome can cause many issues for auto shop owners. Sweating slab syndrome is characterized by the regular formation of condensation on a concrete floor. It tends to occur where humidity fluctuates, such as in facilities located in regions where temperatures change drastically, from cool nights to warm days.

Go Fan Yourself has created a infographic that outlines some of the top safety issues associated with sweating slab syndrome, along with some tips to alleviate the problem (please see below).

 

 

gofan-slab-syndrome.pdf

Edited by GoFanYourself

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