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Joe Marconi

Improve shop productivity with a Focus on what went right, not what went wrong

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Too often we focus on the things that go wrong, and not on the things that go right. Lets face it; everyday things will go wrong. Have you ever watch a professional ball team play an entire game without mistakes being made. A football game where there were no dropped balls?

 

It's more important to focus on the wins, not the losses. I am not suggesting we ignore the mistakes. But if we never recognize what goes right, and only on what goes wrong, we will end up creating a shop culture of negativity. And that will take its toll on production and lost income.

 

Recognize what goes right, understand that mistakes will happen. Use mistakes as a means to improve, not punish. Do this and watch production improve.

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