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HarrytheCarGeek

New Jersey Stops Tailpipe Emission Testing for Older Vehicles.

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http://www.state.nj.us/mvc/Inspections/tailpipe.htm

 

 

Beginning May 1, 2016, the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission is changing the inspection requirements for certain vehicles. Due to the cessation of tailpipe emission testing, the following passenger vehicles now will be exempted from inspection:

  • Gasoline powered vehicles registered passenger, model year 1995 & older with a GVWR 8,500 pounds or less.
  • Gasoline powered vehicles registered passenger, model year 2007 & older with a GVWR 8,501 to 14,000 pounds.
  • Gasoline powered vehicles registered passenger, model year 2013 & older with a GVWR 14,001 pounds or more.

 

They did away with the safety portion in 2010, take a wild guess what has happened to the auto repair business?

 

http://www.state.nj.us/mvc/PressReleases/archives/2010/071610.htm

 

 

MVC Chief Encourages Vehicle Owner Responsibility as State Inspection Program Changes August 1

(TRENTON) – Beginning August 1, biennial passenger vehicle inspections will entail only an emissions check and the exemption for new and used vehicles four years old or newer will be extended to five years under program changes announced today by New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) Chief Administrator Raymond P. Martinez. The changes, which will produce an approximate annual savings of $17 million, will take effect as the MVC continues its efforts to encourage vehicle owner responsibility and regular maintenance through its NJ Inspections public education campaign.

 

 

It's all political wrangling, yet the people that have a vested interest in the matter are not represented. At the end of the day, it seems to me that one must become politically involved.

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