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Junior

Tools/Methods for intake valve cleaning on direct injected engines.

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Its time to invest in some new tools or methods for intake valve cleaning on direct injected engines. Using picks and small brushes just doesn't cut it. The process takes way to long. We do plenty enough VW/Audi work alone to make it worth while to have a special machine for this. I've heard of people using soda or shell blasting. Is there are tool or method out there that can use this process and contain it to the intake port without getting material everywhere?

 

What do you guys do?

 

Thanks!!

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