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Joe Marconi

Beware of Phony Scam IRS Phone Calls!

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This is a different tip this week, but important.

 

There have a lot of phony scam phone calls claiming that the IRS is starting a law suit. If you receive a phone call claiming to the be IRS, hang up. The IRS does not use an automated phone message to start any correspondence, audit or law suit.

 

Also, please pass this information to friends and relatives.

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