Quantcast
Jump to content


mmotley

Honda/Acura Maintenance Schedule

Recommended Posts

I started my shop as specialty shop that solely worked on Toyota/Lexus/Scion. I've decided we are going to add Honda & Acura to our line up, but I've run into one issue. I can't seem to find a concrete maintenance schedule. All I can seem to find is the owner manuals that say just to do whatever the maintenance symbol calls for. That's great, unless they have just been taking it to the 'time-it lube' places where they just drain the oil, spin on a filter, and reset the light.

 

So how do I start to make recommendations for replacing coolant, spark plugs, brake fluid, etc? Does anyone out there have any input/experience with these cars and when to make the recommendations? Or do I just wing it and come up with my own schedule?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Forum Topics

    • 2017 GM 3.6 oil filter issue causing internal engine damage

      The following are posts I made on the AOCA website outlining an issue(potential nightmare) we had on 2017 Chevrolet Colorado:   Randy_Lucyk
      Joined: Dec 21, 2011
      Total Posts: 83  Feb 8, 2018 3:03 PM Unfortunately, I believe this is exactly what this may turn into for shops and consumers. We recently had a report of an oil filter failure on a 2017 Chevrolet Colorado with 13304 miles on the truck and the issue occurred 400 miles after our oil change. Customer had a check engine light come on so he headed right off to the dealer to have it checked under warranty. It had a VVT code stored and the dealer started looking into the issue. They found the filter failure and sent a picture of the image off to the customer. We used a Performax P0171 filter. The customer sent me the attached image of the obviously failed filter. I am immediately highly concerned, but the dealer is being unusually understanding of the failure. We spend some time with the service manager and find out that their appears to be an issue starting to show up on these vehicles, where the stand pipe in the filter housing is coming off with the old filter and being disposed of without the techs knowledge. We had great video of the oil change and their was nothing visible with the old filter as it was removed. The premises is that without the standpipes restricting/diverting functionality in place, full oil flow is blowing out the filter and the everything flows right down the filter housing port into the cylinder heads and remainder of the motor and plugs up components and passages. We asked for a picture of the filter housing and received image 2 attached. This appears that it may be a problem starting in 17 model year, but i can't be sure of that yet. I am digging for additional info now and will update as more information becomes available.  Randy_Lucyk
      Joined: Dec 21, 2011
      Total Posts: 83  Feb 9, 2018 7:59 AM This appears to be both a GM issue and a in-shop issue. 

      Now that I see the notification GM released last week, i believe this issue occurred at the original oil change prior to the one we did. As I said, we had great video of the open end of the old filter as we removed it from the vehicle and I don't believe this stand pipe could have possibly been inside. Their is also no evidence of the tech struggling with anything "down in there" other then the normal A/C line interference issue. . 

      Looking at the design and the A/C line interference, I suspect that the stand pipe is being knocked loose as the filter is being "angled" around the A/C lines to get the old one out. I suspect the oring on the stand pipe is the only thing holding it in the oil filter housing. Once the standpipe is disposed of, the housing has to be replaced, as the stand pipe is not available separately. The housings are in short supply with only three left in the country on dealers shelves and none in Gm distribution centers. Their is a new part number for the housing and those are not available yet. Original pt# 12675707 and new pt# 12682014. 

      Looking at the attached illustrations and notice, it would not be easy to completely miss the fact that a problem was evident. The stand pipe looks too big to me to be easily missed. I suspect it is plastic and the words "housing cracked" was mentioned in the conversation with the service manager. I wonder if the stand pipe is actually cracking during removal of the filter, making it difficult/impossible to reinstall. If we did not do it, then why the old filter had not failed yet ours did, comes into question. Cold weather "full oil flow" was also mentioned in the conversation with the service manager, and those were the conditions at the time of the failure. 

      The images also create some questions for me. The new housing does not appear to be identical to the OE installed housing, so is it an already redesigned housing? The filter bulletin in the Napa/Wix box talks about an update to the filter to include a check valve in the top of the filter. Our old filter does not appear to have this check valve, the Napa/Wix does and our new stock P0171 filters also have it. Looking at the design of the stand pipe in the new housing, it would almost appear that the small nipple on the end of the stand pipe might make more sense if it fit into the open hole of the old filter. The stand pipe design almost seems wrong for the filter with the check valve, unless it is shorter than it looks and never reaches the upper end of the filter. Would be great if the next shop to have one of these off would post some additional pics to try and help reduce confusion. 

      Based on the notice from Gm, this does indeed look like it could get ugly. Although, this dealer covered all the extensive engine repairs under warranty(heads pulled, all new timing components, cleaning passages), i am not convinced all dealers will take that approach. In my case, it was nice(incredible?) to see GM step up and take responsibility. It helped that my customer (owner of the Colorado) retired from a GM primary supplier dealing with issues exactly like this for the later half of his career. He knew the right people to call to get the info needed to drill down to the root cause. 


      Randy Lucyk 
      Midas Kalkaska

      By rpllib, in Technician Corner - Discussions

      • 0 replies
      • 677 views
    • Techs and Specialty Tools

      On going battle between my Manager and Tech staff. They like to look up about everything online before doing the work. When a RO says 'Specialty Tool' they think they need the tool to complete the work. For example, a recent 2009 Lincoln MKX had a RF axle seal leak. Pretty common problem. Tech doesn't want to do it without the tool kit. Took kit would cost more than the job.  We all have seen mechanics who can fix and think their way around an obstacle. I've got a shop full of parts hangers. Perhaps the Lincoln is better suited for a drive line shop or dealer but I figure we can figure it out and get it done like we've usually done. I've had Techs make their own tools and solutions and lately the younger guys just give up if they don't have YouTube instructions and specialty tools.  Thoughts? 

      By 3PuttFever, in Auto Repair Shop Management Help? Post Here!

      • 7 replies
      • 711 views
    • Generic maintenance intervals

      Over the years we have developed some generic maintenance intervals to use on most vehicles. We have revised them as time goes by to reflect changes such as extending oil changes or extended coolant. Here's what we are presently recommending. Our POS system, Winworks Autoshop allows us to set up these intervals so that as a vehicle hits these mileages it automatically recommends them and when we do the service it automatically resets the recommendation in the future. Thoughts? Oil changes:  semi syn  4K,  full syn  8K Alignments: 12K Tire rotations  5K Brake flush  30K Auto trans svce  60K Man trans svce  60K Coolant flush  60K   [older type coolant] 30K Cabin air filters  30K Fuel filter   30K Fuel injection cleaning  30K Spark plugs  copper 30K,  plat, irid 60K Drive belts  80K Coolant hoses  90K Timing belts   90K      

      By tyrguy, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 6 replies
      • 497 views
    • Article: PM Importance - - - Cars need to have a PM schedule... so does the mechanic

      PM Importance          The mere idea of an intermittent problem that can’t be reproduced is a diagnostic situation that comes up way too often for mechanics.  Another is the car that comes in that has had absolutely no preventative maintenance performed, and we all know how that’s going to end up.  After decades of being behind the service counter, as well as under the hood, I do get a bit frustrated that people won’t do any preventive maintenance, or neglect to tell me about an intermittent problem they’ve had forever, because they feel it has obviously nothing to do with the reason they’re here today.            I can only do so much, and without some prior history of any symptoms or what work that has been done, it makes it rather difficult to do my job as a mechanic to the best of my abilities.  Information is the key when it comes to just about any subject, and preventive maintenance can lead to a lot of information, which is by far the cheapest and best way to prevent even larger problems.       I found out the hard way a PM doesn’t just apply to the family car. Your internal engine needs some maintenance once in a while, too. Neglecting the early signs of an intermittent problem with a car may not have as devastating effect as neglecting your body’s own advanced warnings. Let’s face it, a car drops a valve or burns out a PCM, all your friends and family don’t send flowers or come visit you in the service bay. This is one of those times when the sure footed mechanic with all of his snarky comments about people who don’t listen to their car and won’t relay the pertinent information to their mechanic is now the patient, not the repair guy.          Hardly a car will make it for its entire life without clogging the EGR passages, blocking the VVT ports, or have the occasional reduced air flow from of a dirty air filter. It’s inevitable that some sort of maintenance procedure will need to be performed to maintain that “as new” drivability. Me, the mechanic, well… I don’t have a check engine light to forewarn my impending doom.  If I’m feeling a bit down, maybe a bit slow, or a slight tightness in the chest I’m likely to shrug it off and get back to work. Until the pain literally throws me to the floor, while clenching my favorite ratchet to the chest, this stubborn old guy won’t realize I’m about to cash in on that life time warranty I thought I had. You know the type: the “A” personality, all knowing, self-assured, and can take care of any problem on my own mechanic guy.”  Well, age and time, diet, stress, and my family medical history have done me in.  You’ve met your match, Buster. You’re about to throw a rod.             The mechanic with “A” personality traits, and the “I’m the guy with the answers, and I’m right so often it’s a shock when I’m not”, as well as the, “Large and in charge” attitude usually means they’re (I’m talking about myself of course) not likely to listen to anyone else. They tell themselves those chest pains felt off and on are from some bad pastrami, but it’s a heart attack and it’s only going to get worse. And, it did.  I can still hear all the times my wife and kids harped at me as I was being wheeled down the hospital hallways on the gurney, watching the neon lights zip by as I was rushed into Triage.   I hate to say it, but that’s me to a “T”.  I often wondered why the surgeons were held to such high esteems, and why they all seemed to have an air of confidence about them. I believe it’s a result of the years of training, the years of answering questions, and the years of listening to halfwit, poorly conceived ideas of what ails a person from people who have no idea what they’re talking about. Which is not that different than what the trained mechanic goes through on a daily basis.  People ask questions and expect educated answers.          Basically, if you’re one of those guys who pushes himself all day and night, works from sun up to sun down, or tells the wife that my job comes first and we’ll go on that big vacation when I retire, are fooling themselves and their families.  Most of the time you’re so busy you forget to PM yourself.  You overlook the obvious signs of an impending failure from those intermittent chest pains or backaches, etc.  Life’s too short to say, “I’ll wait until later to get checked out.”           Imagine what the surgeon is thinking when he props your chest open, looks in there and sees obvious lack of PM.  Don’t be the mechanic in every situation.  Don’t assume that you can fix everything. There are other people out there who are just as professional in their field as you are in yours. Hopefully you’ll get a second chance as I’ve been given.  Don’t waste it on working until you die. The customer cars will wait.   Follow your body’s PM schedule, and you’ll get to live a little more.
      View full article

      By Gonzo, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 6 replies
      • 308 views
    • Mitchell Notes Field Issue!

      If anyone else has an issue with the limited notes field please tell them. If they receive enough complaints they will fix this. PLEASE help by contacting Mitchell at Toll Free 888.724.6742   Here is my issue:   I believe I got this idea from this forum somewhere. I like to be able to say the words "No Cost" over the phone to a customer with an issue. So I offer a free initial diagnostic. This is when my tech will spend 1 to 10 minutes looking at the customer's concern. Once the tech does this task he comes back to the Service Writer with a request for the proper diagnostic time. The Service Writer then sells the required time for diagnostics. The problem is Mitchell limits the note field and we can not add the proper lines and spaces needed. My work order for the tech should look like this:   Customer concerns:




      Step by Step - What have you tested and what are the results of the tests?:




      What will happen if the customer doesn’t repair this problem?:





      Potential other problems once this is repaired?:




      What will fix it?:



      Parts list:





      Estimated time to repair:

      By UsedTireShop, in Management Software, Web Sites & Internet

      • 1 reply
      • 444 views
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×