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HarrytheCarGeek

How have you dealt with lawyers?

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If you have ever had a controversy with anyone that has require you to hire a lawyer, how did you handle it? What would you do different?

 

 

About 20 years ago I got sued, had to hire a lawyer that turn out more crooked than a mountain road. Through that painful experience, I came across JURISDICTIONARY http://www.howtowinincourt.com/?refercode=CH0004

 

From what I learned from that course, I became interested in legislation and political systems. In looking for understanding, I came across these people and their take on what is the United States:

 

http://www.notmygovernment.us/home/

 

Very interesting information, indeed.

 

How has this affected me as a business owner? Simple, now I know how to direct lawyers and attorneys in my business dealings. Very liberating indeed.

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