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Tracking Numbers Cause SEO Rankings to Fall?

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Hey all!

 

I'm not sure how well versed any of you are in SEO but I have an interesting(?) question.

 

I know (or at least back when I researched SEO a few years ago) one thing that search engines look for is a consistent NAP (name, address, and phone number) for your business. Back when I had just my listings and website all of my phone numbers matched up over the web. And we were in the top 3 in the organic listings and map listings when searching for "auto repair harrisonburg va."

 

However now, we have a tracking number on our website, a different tracking number for yelp, a different tracking number for our CRM "Adversite," and so on and so forth. With that, I've also noticed that our organic and map listing has been falling (we're down to like 6th or 7th now.) I understand some of this may be because my competition is stepping up their SEO efforts.

 

So my question is this, would all of these different tracking numbers cause my SEO ranking to fall since the phone numbers that I have on these various sites are different from the ones that are listed on my Google and other search site listings?

 

Thank you. Have a phenomenal day!

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