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Joe Marconi

Can Your Service Writers Really Overcome Sales Objections?

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If one of your best customers brought his car to you with a brake problem, and you told him the car needed front brakes and brake rotors, would he give you a sales objection? Would he say, “Are your sure it needs the brake rotors too?” or, “Really, that much? I can get those rotors cheaper on the Internet.” Think about it, would you have to go back and forth handling sales objections one by one, until you hopefully make the sale? Your best customers don’t give you a hard time, they simply say yes.

 

The problem? Your top best customers only make up about 20% of your customer base, at best.

 

So, all too often we are stuck with this mentally-exhausting negotiation where we handle objection after objection, until a champion emerges. Either the customer wins or you do.

 

The only way to decrease sales objections is by creating strong relationships with your customers and building value in what you are selling. If you sell parts, labor and price, you better be prepared for sales objections. If you work on the relationship and build a lot of value by promoting your warranty, quality parts, convenience, and by providing world-class service, you will be in much better place. Your objections will go down and your sales will go up.

 

 

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