Quantcast
Jump to content


Should I Share the Weekly Numbers with Employees?


Recommended Posts

We are staring an incentive plan to increase team work between the techs and the office, increase use of the Bolt On Tech system and increase employee pay.

 

We have a tech who seems to be dissatisfied lately. A lot of moaning and groaning. A lot of CYA diags. He does good work and bills good hours, but he's just been passive aggressively making me crazy. He really seems to be in disagreement with the way I run my business.

 

So this tech wants to see the weekly number the incentive will be based on. Do I show him? Do I show him the weekly number and the weekly expenses? I feel that this would lead to further discontentment. What do you think? How much do they need to know?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Water Proof And Self Adhesive

No. Don't be tempted to show your staff, especially someone disgruntled, those figures. You are NOT a co-worker with special access to that information...you are their boss.

There are plenty of ways to "show the numbers" without really revealing the specifics. For example, if your incentive was based on sales growth, you could establish what your sales increase goal (week to week, or monthly) is with your staff, and plot it out as an indexed figure. If your sales growth goal is a 40% increase in sales over the previous year, your data would look like this:

SALES 2014 SALES GOAL (40%) SALES 2015 RATING
Week 1 $1000 $1400 $1400 0
Week 2 $1200 $1680 $1550 -11
Week 3 $2100 $2940 $3100 +8
Week 4 $1800 $2520 $2800 +16

Monthly $6100 $8540 $8850 +5

 

In ALL weeks, you beat last year's sales, but:

In this case, a rating of "zero" means that your company has done very well, and has exactly met it's sales goal.

Any rating with a positive rank is AMAZING, and should be an exciting thing to discuss with your team.

Any rating with a negative rank means the company did NOT meet it's sales goals, so bonus/incentives would be lost, or at least diminished.

 

(In this example, even a rating of -10 still means that your company experienced a growth of 30%...a fact that your staff does NOT need to be made aware of unless you have another bona fide reason for sharing, but since the goal wasn't met, you're not compelled to have to invest in as much of an incentive bonus)

 

Always share PERFORMANCE NUMBERS, not sales/profit specifics, unless it's somehow integral to the employee's success, such as with a service manager in charge of a staff of service writers needing to assess opportunities for improvement in selling work profitably or seeing who's more challenged.

 

I can't stress this enough...your goals MUST be both REALISTIC as well as CHALLENGING. If they see impossible...no one will work toward them. If they seem too easy, no one willl care about exceeding them.

 

Tell your whole staff that you just had an $XX,XXX week, and they'll think you're sitting on a pile of money in the back office. They soon forget about the A/C machine you just bought, the lunch you bought for the staff twice last week, and the advertising attempt that was ineffective, not to mention they won't understand that they may have been the cause of one or more comebacks, there was a big warranty job, a competitor opened up across the street, and the shop's efficiency rating was only 20%.

 

They'll tell you that none of that stuff is any of their business, and I'll tell them that neither are YOUR sales numbers.

 

Just one man's way of engaging the staff

Edited by stowintegrity
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I totally agree with stowintegrity. Only one thing to add as I've been struggling with this issue as well. Employees do have a right to know how their pay is calculated and the numbers involved in calculating that pay. Don't calculate bonus on profit. That opens your books to them or causes trust issues. Hourly is simple. employee comes to work for x amount of hours and get's paid for x amount of hours. Same with flat rate, but then they have a right to know the hours charged on the invoice. I started out paying flat rate paid as jobs were paid for. Some weeks not many customers were in a hurry to pick up their vehicles or we did commercial jobs that were net 30 or whatever, and I'd over pay my employees because I couldn't expect them to be here all week for $100. The other problem I had was the constant need of them to take off early or show up late. I changed to an "hourly" base pay, that covers the first 15 hours of booked time. Then a percentage on the book time over 15 hours. They have incentive to be here and produce hours. I take the risk if it's a slow week and they are here but don't book many hours. Also, I now pay them for all work completed, whether it's paid for or not. It's not their problem if I have commercial customers that take a couple weeks to collect on or a customer that decides he can't afford the work we have performed.

 

I thought about doing some sort of profit sharing plan based on profits, but I don't want to open my books to them. If they want to see the profit and loss statements, they can earn that right by opening their own shop or buying me out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No. Don't be tempted to show your staff, especially someone disgruntled, those figures. You are NOT a co-worker with special access to that information...you are their boss.

 

There are plenty of ways to "show the numbers" without really revealing the specifics. For example, if your incentive was based on sales growth, you could establish what your sales increase goal (week to week, or monthly) is with your staff, and plot it out as an indexed figure. If your sales growth goal is a 40% increase in sales over the previous year, your data would look like this

 

Always share PERFORMANCE NUMBERS, not sales/profit specifics, unless it's somehow integral to the employee's success, such as with a service manager in charge of a staff of service writers needing to assess opportunities for improvement in selling work profitably or seeing who's more challenged.

 

I can't stress this enough...your goals MUST be both REALISTIC as well as CHALLENGING. If they see impossible...no one will work toward them. If they seem too easy, no one willl care about exceeding them.

 

Tell your whole staff that you just had an $XX,XXX week, and they'll think you're sitting on a pile of money in the back office. They soon forget about the A/C machine you just bought, the lunch you bought for the staff twice last week, and the advertising attempt that was ineffective, not to mention they won't understand that they may have been the cause of one or more comebacks, there was a big warranty job, a competitor opened up across the street, and the shop's efficiency rating was only 20%.

 

They'll tell you that none of that stuff is any of their business, and I'll tell them that neither are YOUR sales numbers.

 

 

This is my feeling as well. I appreciate your confirmation. I think we have an authority issue not an information sharing issue

Edited by cshann19
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

hell no.

This guy needs to know his place. I would sit him down and find out what his problem is. If he wont tell then i would tell him his attitude is not appreciated and toxic to the other employees and that if it continues he will lose his job. There is nothing worse than toxic employees, some you can fix, great! and some you wont, such is life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

an added note, you could base a bonus of THEIR performance. If they reach a certain number of hours then a bonus. Allot of times techs are given bonuses based on the overall shops performance but if one tech is not pulling his weight then he still gets a bonus because the shop did great or the other techs picked up the slack and the service writers did good, so why reward that person??

 

We use a bonus for techs based on hours, they reach 45 hours in a week and we start to bonus them, its simple and straight forward, we dont show them our p&ls as their is no need and its not their business. I know successful shops that dont pay any bonuses too.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well the meeting went pretty good. We advised the employees that we wont be sharing business numbers but that we want to see them achieve the bonus. Everyone is kinda hanging their heads around here though. We need to boost moral. I'm sure that comes from the top but I have been fully overwhelmed lately are I'm in Don't Have a Heart Attack Mode. How do I bring the fun back to work?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I pay bonus based on total gross sales, tax included. Its easier for the tech to see how much he's going to get. If he's sweating on a $2500 job he knows he's going to get a reward at the end of the month. Bonuses based on profit opens up a bad can of worms including officer salaries, marketing, depreciation, donations, and a host of other things employees don't think should reduce their bonus. Basically if he works hard he earns an extra paycheck every month.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By carmcapriotto
      The Weekly Blitz is brought to you by our friends over at Shop Marketing Pros. If you want to take your shop to the next level, you need great marketing. Shop Marketing Pros does top-tier marketing for top-tier shops.
      Click here to learn more about Top Tier Marketing by Shop Marketing Pros and schedule a demo:https://shopmarketingpros.com/chris/
      Check out their podcast here: https://autorepairmarketing.captivate.fm/
      If you would like to join their private Facebook group go here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/autorepairmarketingmastermind
      In this podcast episode, Chris Cotton from Auto Fix Auto Shop Coaching shares his expertise on team development within the auto repair industry. He advises against being the best person on your team, as it can hinder growth and lead to burnout. Instead, he offers strategies for building a capable team, such as hiring top talent, training, delegating, and fostering leadership. Chris emphasizes the benefits of collaboration, clear expectations, feedback, and a positive work environment. He also discusses transitioning to a team-focused approach and succession planning. The episode wraps up with Chris offering personalized advice and thanking the audience and sponsor, Shop Marketing Pros.
      The importance of not being the best person on your team (00:01:15) Chris discusses the negative impact of being the best person on your team and its limitations on business growth. The drawbacks of being the best person on your team (00:02:25) Chris outlines the negative consequences of being the best person on your team, including burnout, dependency, and stifled innovation. Building a stronger team (00:06:05) Chris provides practical tips for building a stronger team, including hiring the best, investing in training, and fostering leadership. Transitioning from being the best to building the best team (00:09:41) Chris offers steps to transition from being the best person on your team to building the best team, emphasizing the need for assessment, training, and succession planning.  
       
       
      Connect with Chris:
      [email protected]
      Phone: 940.400.1008
      www.autoshopcoaching.com
      Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/
      AutoFixAutoShopCoachingYoutube: https://bit.ly/3ClX0ae
       
      #autofixautoshopcoaching #autofixbeautofixing #autoshopprofits #autoshopprofit #autoshopprofitsfirst #autoshopleadership #autoshopmanagement #autorepairshopcoaching #autorepairshopconsulting #autorepairshoptraining #autorepairshop #autorepair #serviceadvisor #serviceadvisorefficiency #autorepairshopmarketing #theweeklyblitz #autofix #shopmarketingpros #autofixautoshopcoachingbook
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thank you to our friends at RepairPal for providing you this episode. As shop owners we were part of RepairPal’s Certified network and you can learn more at RepairPal.com/shops.
      Show Notes
      Introduce the article and the 2 options of marketers with an explanation of each Talk about They Ask You Answer Meeting face-to-face and the overall relationship In person vs Zoom Industry events Most locals meet over zoom now anyway Industry knowledge As generalist we had to learn a new client each time Terminology, acronyms. How they make money Auto body shops for example It did make us better marketers Generalist tech vs specialist tech analogy Knowledge about your local area Hot august night Road closures The words you use - pop vs soda, “northshore” Overall results A little subjective There are some great generalists out there We know what works for auto repair It’s like pattern failures on cars for specialists shops Comfort first story The dumpster rental company story  
      How To Get In Touch
       
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected]
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By Changing The Industry
      Can You Have Heart In A Business? #podcast #automotivebusiness #carrepair #autorepairbusiness
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our partners, NAPA TRACS and Promotive
      This week, Hunt talks about a $40 million tax bill that teaches critical lessons on spousal tax liabilities and business strategies.
      Explore the "Innocent Spouse" provision and its complexities: Learn how this provision can shield a spouse from tax liabilities and why proving innocence can be challenging. Understand the tax implications of exercising stock options: Learn the complexities of stock options, including the potential for significant tax liabilities when exercising these options. Learn strategies to protect personal and business assets: Get practical advice on structuring business ownership to manage liability and safeguard your personal assets effectively.  
      Did you know that NAPA TRACS has onsite training plus six days a week support?
       
      It all starts when a local representative meets with you to learn about your business and how you run it.  After all, it's your shop, so it's your choice.
      Let us prove to you that Tracs is the single best shop management system in the business.  Find NAPA TRACS on the Web at NAPATRACS.com
      It’s time to hire a superstar for your business; what a grind you have in front of you. Great news, you don’t have to go it alone. Introducing Promotive, a full-service staffing solution for your shop. Promotive has over 40 years of recruiting and automotive experience. If you need qualified technicians and service advisors and want to offload the heavy lifting, visit www.gopromotive.com.
       
      Paar Melis and Associates – Accountants Specializing in Automotive Repair
      Visit us Online: www.paarmelis.com
      Email Hunt: [email protected]
      Get a copy of my Book: Download Here
      Aftermarket Radio Network
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • Water Proof And Self Adhesive
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our Partners, NAPA TRACS, AutoFix Auto Shop Coaching, and Today's Class In this groundbreaking episode, shop owner Brin Kline undergoes a first-of-its-kind 360-degree review by his team. The session unveils insights into leadership, stress management, communication, team dynamics, and the importance of training. Through candid discussions, Brin and his team explore opportunities for growth and improvement, highlighting the value of feedback in enhancing leadership skills and business operations. Brin Kline, Shop Owner, Assured Auto Works, Melbourne, FL Carlos Mercado, Lead Technician Matt Cusick, Technician JD Winkler, Service Advisor Jeremy Good, CSR
      Brin's Review Plan (00:02:12) Brin discusses his long-standing plan for a 360-degree review, expressing excitement and nervousness about the process. Initial Employee Feedback (00:05:17) Employees introduce themselves, discuss their roles, and provide initial feedback on Bryn's leadership and communication style. Brin's Leadership and Recognition (00:06:42) Employees share their experiences with Brin's recognition and feedback style, highlighting his quiet but supportive approach. Brin's Problem-Solving and Approachability (00:08:53) Employees discuss Brin's willingness to solve problems and his approachability in addressing their needs. Innovation and Motivation (00:11:01) Employees acknowledge Brin's encouragement of innovation and positive influence on their professional growth and motivation. Direction and Advice (00:12:27) Employees affirm Brin's clear communication about the company's direction and his availability for advice and guidance. Conflict Management (00:14:50) Employees discuss Brin's role in managing conflicts and providing support for resolving issues within the team. Celebration of Wins (00:17:16) Employees share their experiences of celebrating wins as a team, highlighting Bryn's support for acknowledging successes. The small wins (00:18:04) Brin and the team discuss the importance of celebrating small victories in the shop and recognizing the challenges in the automotive industry. Celebrating achievements (00:21:20) The team emphasizes the significance of acknowledging and celebrating achievements, even small ones, in the shop to boost morale. Trust and company culture (00:22:06) The discussion revolves around the high degree of trust within the company and the value of the company's culture. Access to training (00:23:58) Brin's commitment to providing access to training for the team, including support for attending conferences and joining training programs like Toastmasters. Stress management (00:28:26) The team discusses how Brin proactively manages stress within the company and encourages employees to take time for themselves. Opportunities for collaboration (00:34:25) The team shares experiences of collaborating with Bryn to improve customer experience, policies, and procedures, highlighting Brin's encouragement for collaboration in problem-solving and diagnostics. Brin's Reflection on Feedback (00:36:20) Brin reflects on feedback and the importance of long-term thinking and motivation for his team. Brin's Training Approach (00:37:17) Brin discusses his approach to training and empowering his team to make decisions, emphasizing the importance of open communication. Brin's Leadership Improvement (00:38:17) Employees provide feedback on areas where Bryn can improve as a leader, including stress management, setting deadlines, and communication. Brin's Reflection on Employee Feedback (00:44:55) Brin reflects on the feedback received from employees, acknowledging the areas for improvement and expressing gratitude for their input. Brin's Acknowledgment and Praise for Employees (00:49:12) Brin acknowledges and praises his employees for their work, expressing gratitude and trust in their abilities. Thanks to our Partner, NAPA TRACS NAPA TRACS will move your shop into the SMS fast lane with onsite training and six days a week of support and local representation. Find NAPA TRACS on the Web at http://napatracs.com/ Thanks to our Partner, Auto-Fix Auto Shop Coaching Proven Auto Shop Coaching with Results. Over 61 Million in ROI with an Average ROI of 9x. Find Coach Chris Cotton at AutoFix Auto Shop Coaching on the Web at https://autoshopcoaching.com/ Thanks to our Partner, Today's Class Optimize training with Today's Class: In just 5 minutes daily, boost knowledge retention and improve team performance. Find Today's Class on the web at https://www.todaysclass.com/ Connect with the Podcast: -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Join Our Private Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1734687266778976 -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on X (Twitter): https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Visit the Website: https://remarkableresults.biz/ -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections            
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...